Mar 252014
 

Today I am delighted to have been asked to liveblog another of the ARTIST ROOMS Research Partnership events, this time hosted in collaboration with Generation: 25 Years of Contemporary Art in Scotland, a forthcoming exhibition at the National Gallery of Scotland.  The seminar has been organised by ARTIST ROOMS and engage with funding from the National Lottery through Creative Scotland. Tweets can be followed on the wider #artistrooms hashtag.

The event, Gallery Education: Developing Digital Resources, is of particular interest to me as EDINA lead the development of a number of innovative digital resources, and I’m particularly interested to hear more about some of the challenges of digital resources around the arts because of our own work on the Jisc MediaHub service.

As usual this is a liveblog so I apologies in advance for any typos, omissions, etc. and welcome all comments and feedback on the post. And if you enjoy today’s post I would recommend looking back at the MOOCS in Cultural Heritage Education liveblog, which now has a number of additional resources and references added. 

Welcome – Sarah Yearsley, engage 

Sarah Yearsley, engage, the National Association for Gallery Education

Sarah Yearsley, engage, the National Association for Gallery Education.

Today is the second event that ARTIST ROOMS and engage have collaborated on looking at digital learning, and part of a series looking at best practice. We also are running the event in collaboration with GENERATION: 25 Years of Contemporary Art in Scotland, which is running events across the country. This is a busy year for ARTIST ROOMS. Engaging with young people is a common theme when we talk about engaging with young people in the context of both ARTIST ROOMS and GENERATION.

Welcome from Damien McGlynn, ARTIST ROOMS.

Damien McGlynn, ARTIST ROOMS.

Damien McGlynn, ARTIST ROOMS.

Damien is giving an outline of the day which will include two discussion groups and an opportunity to see the Louise Bourgeois exhibition, and to play with the Art Hunter app and my colleague Tessa, who produced that, is also here today.

We are running this event with several partner organisations: ARTIST ROOMS, GENERATION and the ARTIST ROOMS Research Partnership. Our colleague Professor Neil Cox from Edinburgh University is here today so do ask him any questions about the research partnership. Now over to Rosie who will chair the morning session.

Morning session: Mapping the terrain and producing content for your audiences.   Chair: Rosie Cardiff, Senior Producer, Tate Digital

Rosie Cardiff, Senior Producer, Tate Digital

Rosie is giving some background on her role, looking after much of the digital learning content on the Tate website. I also manage a small team that manage the Tate Kids and Tate Collective (resources for young people) part of our site, I just wanted to highlight these learning resources. One of these is Circuit, which is working with young people across the country, the website launched recently but will be showcasing digital content produced by young people over the next four years.

Another project which I thought might be of interest, done with Tate Collectives – a young peoples space around the galleries, where we did the 1840s GIF Party – GIFs based on the 1840s gallery. We provided training on how to make the animated GIFs. This was hugely popular. The girl in the grey dress has had over 77k reblogs, but we have also seen a huge spike in interest in the painting itself in the gallery as well.

So those were a couple of projects I wanted to highlight – but do talk to me during the day and ask me about the projects we have been up to recently at the Tate.

So now over to our first speaker, Jen Ross, who is director of the MSc in Digital Education, and also a tutor on the eLearning and Digital Cultures MOOC, which I have had the pleasure of doing and really enjoyed!

Content is just something to talk about: designing for active online learning’ – Jen Ross, Programme Director, MSc in Digital Education, University of Edinburgh

I’m not sure I need to do anything now that Rosie’s shown the work that Tate has done to engage people digitally in the collection… I will be talking about how we do that at the University of Edinburgh. Really the thing that I want to say, my contribution to this day, is “yes, content is amazing, but content is really just something to talk about” whether thats online or face to face in gallery or schools spaces. I will talk about what you can do in the online space, as sometimes its easy to think about what we might do in a gallery or a face to face space just because

“Conversation is king. Content is just something to talk about” – Cory Doctorrow

Jen Ross, Programme Director, MSc in Digital Education, University of Edinburgh

Active learning has been a huge movement in teaching and learning spaces. You see spaces where learning takes place around tables – like today – rather than lecture theatres. And digital spaces can be a way to encourage that active learning without needing to reconfigure the space. the barrier to creativity is lower when we talk about participating digitally. And you can really evidence that work you do with people – the Tumblr page that Rosie showed is an exceptional way to evidence the impact on young people they are trying to reach.

So as you think about these spaces today I want you to think about these spaces and how they can be connected, intimate, busy, creative, exploratory and inspiring. Its not just about putting content in the digital space.

So I wanted to show you some good examples of work that our students have done around digital creativity. We have a module “e-learning and Digital Cultures” which is part of the MSc in Digital Education. This was the starting point for the MOOC, it was also the first module we had run that was entirely openly shared – students had to be enrolled but what they produceed was all shared openly online. And we really asked students to make multimodal work, to express what they had engaged with in the course. So in 2013 we asked our small masters group to engage with the much huger MOOC course and how they had encountered that. So people made videos, they shared things on Pinterest, we had people creating visual people and making interpretations around the. And also using onlione resources that only exist online – for instance “ThingLink”. Some of our students are really digitally savvy, but even those who are not can use the big list of interesting resources to create engaging materials.

That process worked really well and so we set, as a final assignment on our 5 week free global #EDCMOOC course, we also asked for multimodal assignments. Not everyone commits to the course throughout but those who did were asked to create a digital artefact, which was peer assessed by others on the course. And we have gathered these publicly. So this padlet I’m showing represents only about 300 of those produced but it gives some sense of scale. But if you ask people to create things they really respond.

Image showing the padlet of #edcmooc artefacts

I also wanted to show you a trailer for a game which some of our students on our game based learning module did, “Tomorrow Calling Trailer”, this was so much more than was required for the credits for the course. If you give students the right content, and something to create with some relevance to them personally and/or professionally, than they really do respond.

This Open Badges and Open Accreditation open education resource is something that was produced for my module Digital Futures, and again this is so much more than you would expect in a postgraduate essay, and it’s lives on beyond the class.

Sometimes students go further still. And here we see a multimodal dissertation (multimodaldissertation.weebly.com). When you open these avenues up, then you really see unexpected things like this take place.

This is our Dissertation Festival, which takes place in Second Life. This is a space for collaborating and sharing experience with each other. These kinds of spaces and collaborations are another way to think about what you can do in an online space which are not about just creating new content or resources. A Digital resource can just be about making a space for interaction, a space for people to work together.

And this is a project that some students did, totally separate from their coursework, asking students learning online to reflect on the playlist that has inspired their work (www.elearnenmuzik.net). Again these are projects emerging from the context of the Digital Education programme, but come out of people engaging in digital spaces and being involved in things that they are interested in.

So what I want to leave you with… whatever you are thinking about or planning, do think about not only good content or resources but also how it can be a great active learning space for your learners, for your audiences.

‘Digital fear & beyond’ – Rohan Gunatillake, Co-producer, Sync

And now over to Rohan, co-producer at Sync a collective supporting technology and the arts, and he’s also been working in the Digital R&D fund for the arts:

What I’m going to do is talk about… well I don’t have a background in education but I have spent the last four or five years working with arts organisations and technology and digital. And talk about some of the issues either supporting or getting in the way of really interesting work in the arts. A lot of that for me is about recognising that working with digital technologies isn’t about technology, but about people.

Rohan Gunatillake, Co-producer, Sync

The story sort of begins… I moved to Scotland four years ago. Mainly for love, but also because I got a gig with the Edinburgh Festivals! I came to start a project with the Festivals called the Edinburgh Festivals Innovation Lab – Edinburgh Festivals is the group of both the very big festivals and the smaller and much more niche festivals. The question we have here was that, like you, these are great organisations and very busy and in the domain of innovation and digital practice they are doing what they think they should… but where are the other opportunities? What other possibilities are there? What have they missed? So I was looking across the 12 festivals to look at that. Some worked well, some worked less well but all were really useful for trying new ways of working.

One of the big core things we did with the festivals was that obviously the festivals are a rich resource… and Edinburgh University has generated a great technology and start up scene… but they didn’t talk to each other. So the thing Sync is best known for is for the Culture Hack Scotland 2011 which was this big event to bring these groups together. Scotland is not a big enough country for those sectors not to be talking to each other.

And then Creative Scotland liked that festivals work… and wanted us to do that across Scotland. So we had a two year project called Sync and again this was about creative relationships, not just transactional relationships. And we carried on running the Culture Hacks – these are 48 hour opportunities for technologists, producers, artists, arts organisations, all getting locked into a room to create stuff. Amazingly each year people come and about 30 projects get made. And we have supported that with the Geeks in Residence programme where we’ve taken developers to arts organisations from the Royal Opera through to arts organisations in Eigg. We wanted organisations to see what it would be like to have a technologist in your organisation, in your building coming up with ideas and projects specifically for you. And that’s been really interesting and challenging. We’ve also created this magazine, Sync Tank, highlighting this type of practice across the UK and across the world.

I have also been working on the Digital R&D Fund for the Arts – this runs in England and Wales, and on a smaller scale in Scotland – which funds experimental projects (about 60 each year) around galleries, often around education as well. I am a “learning partner” – I listen across all the projects and pick up the themes and the big stories, and tell the story of that to the wider sector. We do that through the website and also through a print magazine which will be printed in the summer.

Even summarising the insights from Sync takes a long time so I just wanted to highlight three things coming out of these three strands of work. And these are in the context of what makes the most

How we are arts organisatins can move past the commissioning mindset. The pastiche of how the arts work with technologists or digital agencies is that, I give you £5k, technologist goes back to studio in Leith. And when they come back everyone is unhappy. That’s been how we have commissioned in the past, often about websites. Often these projects are approached like physical builds – big plans, fundraising, and unexpected ongoing costs. That’s the pastiche. What Sync – and others – have tried to do is to break that. Sometimes that is the right approach – if you know what you want to achieve and have requirements to deliver again. But when we see the kind of experimental work Jen was explaining, the Tate Digital world… where do those ideas come from? How do you assure that those are strong enough ideas? Sometimes your team can do that, and that’s great, but often the best ideas come from conversations with others coming from another perspective, an outside point of view. We can easily think our audience want the same from our work as us. So arts organisations can feel that metadata is really interesting – really useful for them but is it what people want to do? Maybe a niche! So you need to try to establish what users really want. We’ve seen that where that really works, two things happen. Firstly the organisation lets the digital talent to bring their intelligence into the room in a really open way, not just give them things to do. So in our Geeks In Residence programmes I went and interviewed directors of the organisations wanting a Geek, they talked about collaboration, and when the Geek showed up they closed into a commissioning mindset. We used the mindset that if you have a photographer in residence you wouldn’t tell them what to take, what lens to use, what shutter speed… as they began to understand that metaphor, that you would never do that, then something more constructive could take place. So as long as you think about what you want to achieve, but not be too perscriptive, that goes well. And the other thing that works really well is co-creating with audiences, involving them in the design process. And we’ve seen Unlimited Theatre doing fantastic work here. That’s one big message.

The two cultures thing?. We like to tell the story of technology and the arts as being two cultrues… but what I notice in practice is that the clash of cultures is actually the “deliver the project” methodology that people are using. I said people approach digital like capital builds. there is a gantt chart or basecamp… that’s how they see digital project delivery. But there is another part to the process in start up and web culture around prototyping, iterating, testing in public, taking feedback to improve. That iterative model is very different approach. It’s like Prince2 versus Agile. What we have found is that some arts organisations really understand that… they are used to the culture of the rehearsal room, to creating that way. Others are cautious, if not terrified, of showing something half made in public. Because of how they normally present work. Agile and Lean are thrown about but if we want to successfully do that stuff, it can require a different mindset.

Digital Fear. Part of what Sync does is take people out to drinks. Once every three months we invite four or five people running arts organisations out for a drink, with an invite along the lines of “when it comes to this digital stuff, the common complaint is I don’t have time or don’t have money. Tell us what you really feel”. That invitation tries to create as a conversation… the Festivals work was around a big data project, technical challenges that were solvable, there were business issues which we solved, and then we still had the “I’m just not quite sure about it” factor – the emotional part. And thats the most significant and most under talked about part of digital innovation in the arts. We call it Digital Fear. What comes up in these conversations re things like “I’ve been an expert in my field for 20 years, now I’m not an expert”, “I speak to the web developer and I feel like I’m talking to  my children”. That’s real stuff. That’s messy emotional gut stuff that is much harder to solve than the business or technical challenges.

As a coda to my kind of “drunk uncle” speech/provocation here… we are a relatively small player, we’ve been invited by Creative Scotland to bid for another two years, and we are placing three things at the heart of our proposal is:

  • Practice – if whatever digital work you are doing isn’t about your core practice then you will never get senior buy-in. If it’s not about what’s on stage for you, then that’s not what you should be doing. How are digital tools changing your core practice?
  • People – it’s the people who actually make the work. You hear about amazing work but behind all great digital projects is a very tired and very brave digital person!
  • Process – we often talk about projects… but the risk is that if you just fund projects we just have lots of nice projects but no organisational or sector embedded learning. So how do we embed innovative learning and processes into our organisations. This is a much more sustainable way to build this stuff – the teach a man to fish idea.

So that’s Sync, and that’s us… thank you!

Discussion group one: Audiences and digital content

We are now moving to discussions in our groups (I’m on the Purple table) so notes here will be sparse as we get chatting but I’ll be capturing the reporting back to the room shortly.

Rosie is introducing our discussions here drawing the sheet on each asks us to consider:

  • Who is your target audience?
  • How will you measure the success of your digital learning project?
  • How will you produce content for your audience? Can you repurpose existing content?
  • How will you engage and interact with your audience? Where will that be?
  • What will the ongoing legacy of the project be once it is produced? How will it be maintained and sustained – not just technically but to keep things fresh.

So, we will be thinking about and discussion these for the next 50 minutes. And I’m sure anyone reading the blog today would be encouraged to do the same and to tweet any comments to the #artistrooms hashtag.

Discussion group sesstion

Some thoughts from our group:

We have been talking about our own contexts and backgrounds, and the kinds of projects we are working on. There is a fairly common focus on young people so we are just unpacking that a bit: thinking about how to make young people feel welcome in the space, using the right language for young people, the use of the right spaces (such as Tumblr, Twitter, Instragram, and custom websites) and a focus for young people as co-producers in these space – posting to the accounts for the night etc, and to some extent training young people in the skills and confidence to use these technologies, and the meaning of doing so on behalf of an organisation (professional skills). Ownership and active contribution are being flagged as the most effective way to create better digital projects, and to build ambassadors in those groups.

Some discussion of practical issues and kit: phones, ipads, that can be used, laptops within the office – but the logging on/take over of accounts takes place when they are in our spaces – we log them in. Discussion of a real sense of caution about how acceptable that stuff is, how much control the organisation can and should have, and what challenges some submissions can raise – do you show critical work? what is the impact of that? Can raise really thorny issues, so you need processes in place to deal with that. The more you involve your audiences, the more those issues are raised. When content is out of copyright, this stuff can be easy, but often you are much more restricted than that… that area of IPR is tricky. You cant let people use the artwork, maybe they have to be inspired by it instead… you have to think laterally. And then when you do ask for contributions you have to have clear guidance, clear terms, ways to ensure that any clear problem can be dealt with but there are lots of grey areas.

We are now discussing the types of projects we might have in mind… one of our participants talks about schools groups coming to a museum in the same building, but not tending to come to the gallery. And real challenges around creating materials for teachers during the time ever changing exhibitions are running. But a recommendation: Group for Education in Museums, part of the Scottish Museums group, which are the generic resources/activities called “Hands On” – a downloadable PDF. And Glow also offers potential – you can bring an archive to life, getting artists to talk about their work – almost creating little programmes, setting a series of challenges. Glow Meet works really well as it’s live and interactive and at the end there are resources to explore. An online platform to use… but it hooks in pupils but also teachers and parents now primed for involvement. But schools work is obviously working with the teachers, not necessarily the young people. But there are also new youth arts club ideas that take it out of formal spaces… that’s happening this year. There will be 12 hubs around Scotland, a different way to connect with young people. Also Code Club (for 9-11 year olds) learning online coding, also apps. We have kids using Scratch, and now HTML, and working with an online gaming company whose staff volunteer – as part of staff development. That company are now looking at accreditation. But code clubs are free to do, need to be volunteer run, there are free resources to use. And it seems effective and really creative – lots of ideas and collaboration taking place, a whole group to continue working with… skills based and bipassing and teachers’ own Digital Fear. And it gets interesting as the youngsters start encountering code used in industry.

And we are moving onto the idea of measuring success and how one might do that… depends on the aims, and how clear those are. And about what the audience thinks is working for them, what they would change, how they feel about it. Changing attitudes in an organisation can also be part of what you are measuring. Also discussion of Retweeting young people’s comments, using texts to reach people. Discussion of what counts for an organisation – just about the physical space or can organisations appreciate online engagement? How does that take place? How is that measured? Are likes etc. useful? How do you reflect richer interactions and what ways can you find to encourage that. Discussion of how to stay cool – Tumblr is engaging but niche, Instagram is big, Google+ Hangouts offer great opportunities for live Q&As.

Questions and Feedback

Red Table: we talked a lot about young people as our audience. We talked about finding platforms to use, in consultation with groups. We also talked about working with groups for longer periods of time, and leaving space for platforms to be changed or developed over time. Copyright came up in relation to the challenges of engaging with modern contemporary art.

Blue Table: we talked some of the projects taking place, particularly the GENERATION projects. The audiences often quite different as within gallery sector and artist educators. Talked about th eneed to provide something to different, not to replicate what you do, not to replicate what others are doing – e.g. why would we replicate MOMAs online courses. We talked about successes and moving away from the idea of numbers, and followers, and hits, but instead the quality of engagement. Hard to do, people don’t always comment or respond. It can look like you are failing – people can have a good experience without feeding directly back to you, so we talked about how you can understand that people enjoy what you do. And we also talked about organisational change and cultures. Also talked about the time and cost and challenges of suiting multiple platforms. And also social platforms – how we interact rather than push things out, and how that builds your organisations reputation. Also briefly talked about legacy – short term digital and social contractors result in expertise just leaving with the person.

Yellow Table: talked about sometimes the need to use digital is communicated, rather than the use of technology coming from the audience, and being about their experience. About focusing more on content than on technology delivering it. Some digital fear. Real feeling that many of the stats funders require are not actually that useful, that qualitative feedback is key and that there are better ways to capture that stuff. Then there was also the feeling that once digital content is out there you can find unexpected audiences…. seen to be a good thing but then do we respond to that… do we have more opportunity to learn from that inside of a  project – not just use in the next one. Lots of interest in Geek in Residence approach, the scariness of iteration too though and the organisational change required for that to work.

Green Table: We had a fairly wide ranging discussion. One thing that hasn’t come up yet… a kind of internal issue that we can be quite object focused, that the engagement with a particular object and the mediation of that encounter with the object. Lots of work already there but more to be done there. Talked about some local authority challenges – how things like ARTIST ROOMS or GENERATION can create opportunities for trying things out, to feed into other projects. Words like “risk”, “trust” and a fear about sharing a not fully formed project or website, that can be quite scary particularly in this economic climate. And we did mention the word copyright.

Purple Table: We spoke quite a bit about audiences. The majority of us were working with young people, schools or teachers. And the challenges of that. And talking about what success looks like – is it museum or gallery footfall? Or can you change organisational culture to count those engaging online, what does success look like there. And we also talked about some of the challenges of asking young people in to participate – and what happens if contributions are critical of your organisation or of your funders and how you deal with that. Also some concerns around very quick turnaround exhibitions,lots per year, and how one can generate content or resources to meet that schedule – and the possibilities of generic resources to help in those scenarios. Also talked about platforms… maybe drift from Facebook, where are young audiences going… and the potential of Google Hangouts – guiding people around a space at a distance. We had on our table some people who don’t have collections to work with, some fully formed apps, through to young peoples groups. Real diversity there so real opportunity for more sharing around these models.

And now more questions and discussion:

Q1) I wanted to ask about “bring your own devices” – I’ve heard schools talking about not investing in hardware but encouraging their students to bring their own devices…

A1) We allow students to bring their own devices, but have a device pool for accessing our app on site as well. It’s just launched so will be tested this summer.

Comment) Nick would just like to mention the Warhol MOOC with Glyn Davis, from the school of design. For those that want to try that technology.

And now we will move into the lunch part of the day…. so the blog will be quiet again for a wee bit!

Lunch – An ARTIST ROOMS exhibition Louise Bourgeois, A Woman Without Secrets will be on display in Modern One (Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art).  In-gallery ArtHunter app demonstration will also be available.

Image of Damien demonstrating how the app works on an iPad outside the New Acquisitions exhibition.

Damien demonstrates how the app works outside the New Acquisitions exhibition.

Image of a group Testing out Art Hunter at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Testing out Art Hunter at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Welcome back, Christopher Ganley, ARTIST ROOMS

So I just want to welcome everyone back with some thank yous. Thank you to Nicola for blogging today – we will circulate the link after the event. Thank you to Rosie, Rohan and Jen for this morning’s session. And above all a huge thank you to our funders for making this event possible.

Afternoon session: Marketing and evaluating digital resources – Chair: Tessa Quinn, Head of Digital, National Galleries of Scotland

I wanted to start off by talking a bit about what we do. We are quite lucky in having a digital team. We’ve been doing things including the Art Hunter app, and  the Titian and Diana iOS7 App for iPad, that latter was something our funders were really keen for. We are also creating a mobile version of the website, and that has included some changes and decision making around the website. I have also been developing a Digital Engagement Strategy and there are four key areas of that: Working collaboratively within and outwith the organisation – digital is no longer just for the geeks but about part of the mainstream; To Open up our collection; To grow our audiences; And to increase income.

Our strategy says we want to grow our audience by learning more about them. We did talk a bit about analytics, about what is or can be useful. And we want to know them to design for them, not for what we think they want. And with all this learning, we need to take some action. So you need room to look at your learning, look at your analytics, and look for possible change and improvement.

Tessa Quinn, Head of Digital, National Galleries of Scotland

Even though we have a digital team doesn’t mean that we don’t learn or make mistakes…. what we found useful was WeAreCulture24 Action research – they brought organisations together to talk about sharing analytics across 22 organisations. It allows you to see the differences and similarities across the sector, across the organisations. I highly recommend the report “Lets Get Real 2” – and we really started to learn how to learn. When we look at redesigning the homepage we learn from where people click. Every department wants a page there but that’s not how visitors actually use it… and that’s about coming up with a question, then seeing if the numbers will give us an answer.

One of the things that we are trying to learn is that for ten years we have been trying to build digital content, some great stuff… but we are terrible at telling people about these products, making sure they find them… its something we could be much better at. And with that in mind I want to introduce you to David Craik Director of engagement consultants Bright Signals, he’s also formerly head of marketing for S1.

‘Agile Marketing’ – David Craik, Director, Bright Signals

I’m going to talk today about Agile Marketing – a good marketing buzzword (because it is). I will tell you a wee bit more about what we do. We set up Bright Signals about four years ago. We really create content. We do digital marketing for Tennants lager, working for Channel 4 for the Commonwealth Games, working with Ambition Scotland, also the National Piping Centre.

Hopefully what I’ll get across today is that marketing is really changing. The days of pushing and cajoling are over. Marketing is about giving people what they want, content they want and enjoy. Either we all work in marketing, or – maybe a better way to think of it – none of us do!

So we are about lots of creativity, but there is also increasingly an expectation that we can measure everything. There are many more channels than we ever had in the past. The pace of change is very fast! So one approach here is Agile Marketing. So to explain what this is… a history lesson… way back before 2001 most IT projects were based around bamboozling Gantt chart. And as digital began to explode it became clear that this “waterfall” approach didn’t work for digital – they were delivered late, over budget, and worst of all they didn’t deliver what users wanted. So a bunch of techies in California came up with the Manifesto for Agile Software Development. This set out principles that highlight flexibility. Away from that idea of project management, structures, etc. towards this flexible stuff. Did it catch on? Yes, it really did. Google for instance is all about changing based on what the audience wants. Mark Zuckerberg talks about “moving fast and breaking things”.

So what does this have to do with marketing?

David Craik, Director, Bright Signals with one of his slides

David Craik, Director, Bright Signals with one of his slides.

Well traditionally marketing has been about “big bang” campaigns, TV stuff, etc. With marketing… John Wanamaker said “I know half my advertising is wasted, I just don’t know which half”. It was about knowing it wasn’t working, and not knowing how to measure that. And then we have the HIPPO – the most HIghly Paid PersOn’s decision. Often who drives decisions, but rarely represents users need.

So Agile marketing principles?

  • Less big band campaigns, more small scale experiments
  • Less subjective opinions, more evidence
  • Less talking, more doing

We work every week on content, we develop a “back-log” of relatively small scale targeted marketing activities – or break up the bigger stuff – each with defined performance measure. And we deliver in short fixed cycles of creative and content development, then we ship, prototype etc. And we re-prioritise all the time in response to those measures.

Does anyone use Google Ads? Well if we look at search results to hotels in Glasgow… you would bid on a click on that advert (e.g. £1 per click). Advertising is interesting here because of the side of the audience. There are 694,000 searches each second. And that audience is pretty close to the point of conversion, the point of buying. On facebook the ads might be distracting or annoying. If I’m searching Google I probably want to buy or book things. And all that makes ads a great way of getting insights. Not necessarily sales but insights into what audience wants.

So if I’m setting up a wine shop I can set up an A/B testing ads… I’m trying to work out “wine order” or “ordering wine”, and “deliver wine” or “wine home delivery”. I place two ads, I use the two different words. I find out which one people click on. I don’t even have to set up delivery to test what will work. So that’s an example of how this can work….

Thinking about that pipeline… we use a tool called Trello, like a virtual stickies board. So we have ideas in the right hand column. Loose notional thoughts. Then it moves into a development phase…. might not go anywhere, might go into development and cost checking. And if it goes into production we then usually commission others – techies etc… and then it goes to live. There are two live columns that we use – Live – proven, Live – measuring. It only moved to Proven when run several times and engagement checked – e.g. on facebook it would be likes, comments and sharing. Only when it hits a level, e.g. 1% it moves to proven. If it doesn’t work it shifts to ditched….

So, for example… Brooklyn Museum had an exhibition of Indian Paintings. They set up a thing online where you saw a painting for a few seconds each and asked users to rate their favourites.

Looking at stuff we do every day… we work with Hornsby’s Cider – asking poeple to identify a building; project for Channel 4 called 9point88 about the Oscars; and for Tenants Lager about fixtures etc. None of these are directly anything to do with the product…. it’s tangental… that Brooklen Museum is example is just about the product. You in galleries and museums are so lucky in that you have great products, people care about that. For many brands there isn’t always that sort of devotion to the content. People are passionate about your product…

David Craik, Director, Bright Signals showing examples of new, innovative museum experiences.

David Craik, Director, Bright Signals showing examples of new, innovative museum experiences.

So how do you bring content into the museum experience. I was lucky that I was able to attend South by South West last year – and learned a lot. I made a point of attending a talk by Leslie Walk on the future of digital content for museums and galleries. She said “museum attendance are in decline. and hat;s partly because there’s something missing from most visit experiences… Play”. Now we can argue that perhaps but the examples she went on to give, about play in a good way, was the Cleveland museum of art and something called the “Gallery One” project. Now this had a £20M benefactor. But one of these ideas was just asking participants to take a picture of themselves replicating a sculpture – using an Xbox basically so quite cheap, similarly making a face like a sculpture, and then a bit interactive wall to engage with the content in a different way. Now this latter screen was so costly and perhaps more obvious. But the cheaper fun stuff – those statue and sculpture exhibits – were so much more engaging because they are playful. And that’s the tone of the brilliant Art Hunter app we’ve been trying out as well…

We are seeing Google putting the gallery exhibition tour online through google maps. We have Google Glass on it’s way and, by all accounts, wearables will be a big sector. The hardware – the hard to do stuff – has been done. The opportunity potential is content relevant to the location of the person wearing them. A relatively easy way to add content to the user experience.

And there’s a project called Google Tango, which uses 3D sensors to measure the space around you… making it much easier to put a layer of interactive content around it. Would cost a fortune to develop but this will be shared by Google very soon…

I wanted to talk about conversion iteration – facebook does this all the time because tiny tweaks make such a difference. SkyScanner, for my money the most successful digital company to come out of Scotland, they also iterate. They also do a form of A/B testing. They have a button that gets you to book, and that generates income for them. They started with “book”, they decided to test out “continue”, “select”, “go”. Which do you think led to the biggest improvement. Most of us think the latter…. The actual results…. for “continue” they had +0.95% clicks; “select” had + 6.41% clicks; and “go” saw -1.80% clicks. Now any increase is massive for their income. But I would have guessed, like most of you did, that “go” would be huge. Now you can test this easily… and in some markets they saw a 30% increase for “select”. So testing is so crucial here. Now Skyscanner has a really clear focus on a clear metric. They develop hypotheses from task-based one-to-one user testing. They keep it simple – isolate on A/B at a time. Senior Management respect the data. And they test this stuff with Google Analytics – which is free. And this process makes a huge difference but is ongoing, it needs iterating over time…

So, to summarise… we have issues like HiPPos, we need to be flexible, AdWords are low risk and low cost, interactive experiences can bring digital into a physical space…. and to remember Skyscanner’s approach to A/B testing…

Q1) I suppose you had Google Glasses on there… there is a company bringing out better virtual reality hardware – the Occulus Rift – will that be better?

A1) Really it’s all about content, what’s useful to the user…. don’t overthink it about what’s new and spectacular or cutting edge. You have content. That’s what people are interested in. It’s about how you connect up that digital thing to that real thing. The planning for that Cleveland gallery and that huge interactive wall… they wanted to create interactive experiences in the gallery… but they pulled back to focus on enhancing the real pieces of art. It’s about what layer of content can you apply to enhance the real thing…

So we now have table discussions…

Discussion group two: Evolving and marketing your digital resource

Tessa is outlining our key points for discussion:

  • How will your target audience find out about your digital learning project?
  • Is there anything else that can be done to help people find it?
  • What analytics will you collect? Is there A/B testing you could do?
  • Is there any other information you would like about how your audience responds to your learning project? How might you collect it?
  • How will you use this information? When will you use it? This is the key one!

Again I am on the Purple table…

We are discussing the silos between marketing and other teams…. and also how low conversions may be between social media activity and website information about exhibitions, and then to the exhibitions themselves… but the possibilities of competitions etc. Marketing can have a lot of control over channels which can complicate things… and how to challenge silos… and how to provide guidance to staff…  talk of QR codes and iBeacons (largely used in retail), the idea of something that detects your location that can be used inside… And of the potential unattractiveness of QR codes and potential for crafted objects… and of Augmented Reality (e.g. Layar).

Thinking about A/B testing, analytics… and how people find our stuff. We find that things on EventBrite helps… getting the band out there… interesting stuff like engaging with other cultural events, sitting near other events… if we want a younger audience being grouped by which bands etc. have gigs can be really useful. Affiliating yourself with things that your target audience are interested in. Noting that Tumblr gives a good visualisation of key influencers in material going viral… really useful to see that visually. Also talking about the importance of having something physical in the space that points to the digital… Physical spaces and physical/print materials… and the importance of memorability. But then working out what works…  There are also challenges. We really market stuff we know will sell well sometimes, for complex reasons. And there is audience awareness beyond your control…

Old stuff has value too… especially unique stuff. Make stuff findable for a much longer life… make sitmaps, tag stuff, add sharing buttons, Wikipedia is great for that… connections from there generate lots of referrals. Use unique materials or expertise in your digital resources… that makes a big difference. Exploit what you have.

How do you go further than the obvious local channels? Building your mailing list and audience helps… how do you push beyond that? The App Store is another channel to promote stuff… there is no arts area – there is leisure, travel and education. Can seek reviews etc. and have your team be ambassadors… A lot of this goes right to the top… your programme will attract different audiences in the same way… and appeal to different demographics, keep them aware of other shows coming up… Programming does make a difference, and won’t always align with your target audiences/overarching strategy. Discussions also of deep engagement with the work… that being the goal not necessarily numbers. And how one measures the quality of engagement. Visitor books can help in person…. but so many people don’t fill them in… A way of surveying people or recording that visit. Just writing down good comments etc.  Sometimes this stuff is ad hoc. But you could potentially do that digitally.. people like to see how others respond to the work. I was at the Oceans exhibition at Fruitmarket Gallery – collecting water from the seas, collecting stories alongside. That’s got such huge potential!

Feedback from Groups

Red Table: Had a meandering discussion about what digital learning is. About analytics and Google Analytics. We talked about a project on a closed forum – not as obviously relevant to analytics. We talked about interpretation, and relating everything back to the collection (where you have one). This came out of the Brooklyn Museum aspect,the ideas of the collection as asset… an archive of learning objects, or images, looking at content again.

Blue Table: We mostly ignored the prompts and had a sort of impromptu Google Analytics training… talking about what was possible, what could be done… what could be got in terms of demographics etc. And understanding who is using what and how useful that data might be. And we talked about better targetting online and offline… things like making sure you do promote digital learning adn resources on your website, linking to relevant works, etc. Doing what Google does in offering the right things for what people search for. And also about making sure that things are prominent in the physical space – like use of the Art Hunter logo at exhibition entrances and gallery entrances. Also about A/B testing and Google Analytics… try changing labels perhaps to see if clicks change.

Green Table: We had an interesting conversation. All day we’ve had problems thinking about our audience, and whether we know enough about them. Similarly around analytics – what we collect, how best to do that. Had some really interesting discussions about digital, about the possibilitis of the second skin, if you like, on top of what is already exhibited in collections. Also about if we are using social media and trying to market things… do people who are very busy fail to open emails? Twitter feeds are on our websites… are our websites as effective as they could be… or do we just change one thing on the site to make things better – like the button tweaks. So really how to make exhibitions more personal, more interactive, how do we get their responses? Do we still rely on paper? Is that wrong? Is a piece of paper in the post effective? Should we be doing that if advertising digital learning or resources. David’s point about not making things too difficult… and really think about what your key message is, and your key measures… people said they had used measures but probably not regularly enough.

Purple Table: We had quite a wide ranging discussion as well… augmented reality… tracking locations in other ways too… also how you are set up organisationally… that marketing targets might be different to what you want to achieve, and how you can get around that… we also talked about the importance of the physical space and the linkages around physical and digital resources. For some audiences, particularly older audiences, print can still be important. Talked about digital resources potentially having a longer lifespan – through Google, through Wikipedia, etc. And really thinking about what the unique selling points of your organisation might be, if you have iconic items or key unique expertise, then you have something unique that no-one else has, you can really help get other things out there. And talking about digital stuff – reviews being important for instance. Asking your audience to share and support it and be ambassadors for you, influencers that reach more people… etc.

Yellow Table: Also a wide ranging discussion. Talked about how flexibility to respond sounds good but some concern about timescales. Discussion of social media… could we do it better? Could we do it for each other and help each other? And talking about quite physical digital resources – creating material that can be brought out into the space, not just online. The HiPPo thing struck a chord. Thought analytics and data could be really useful from that regard. Got a bit confessional about making assumptions – and the wrong assumptions – about what people want. Research being important here. Also we may not know what we will change… but we may go back and ask different questions. To find quick wins and small changes.

Panel discussion with speakers (David, Rosie, Tessa)

Image of the Panel Discussion, showing David Craik, Tessa Quinn, Rosie Cardiff

Q1) How have you monitored Art Hunter in the last year? Also how could it be used in events or one off things – not just artefacts

A1 – Tessa) There is an app evaluation package, called Flurry, which allows us to see downloads, usage, how many items they are collecting etc. tines of day being used. But so much data… we needed to find the questions we wanted to ask. We saw a spike when we launched it. We currently have around 100 downloads per month of each version (iOS and Android). And because we are about to redevelop it for GENERATION we have been able to use that data to help us do that. We found, for instance, that 60% of people use it outwith gallery hours… we don’t know why but we can now ask those questions… and we want to also see what we can do that takes it beyond the gallery space to see how to make it more useful. And we have also been doing some research on gallery visitors about whether they have used the app, and how it has impacted their experience.

We have tried to keep the app as open as possible with unlockable content. We have the button called “Extra” – could be any number of things which could include events. We did try using it for two Friends events. But for partner offers our partners wanted to track a lot of what was going on which was harder to do… but for GENERATION we’ll think about that again.

A1 – David) In terms of analytics…. Google Analytics has several thousand measures. We talk about “the critical q” – for any organisation there are key questions – probably three of them – that really matter, and those need to be questions you can actually address. So conversion rate (e.g. for Skyscanner) might be on of those measures.

Q2) Was wondering about that Lets Get Real report – and the key findings there…

A2 – Tessa) that one question “why did you visit the website today?” was just part of the website. Of those only 30% wanted to visit the gallery that day, but our website was so focused on that. There was so much more being looked for… and a need for consumable, browsable data…

A2 – Rosie) We found that we had about 40% international visitors… so they may not step foot in the gallery. Particularly in terms of learning resources they have an interest far beyond those who visit… but is that what your organisation is about? If you are all about attendance and ticket sales that might not be useful to focus upon. To have those priorities…. I think each person in Tate would have their own response. It would be hard to get a consistent organisation-wide view of that. We all want to give a great experience… but we have very different ways to do that.

A2 – David) With Critical Q it doesn’t really matter if they differ… having your three for you to focus on is useful.

A2 – Tessa) One way to do that is to have different dashboards for different parts of the organisation…. to help deal with that.

A2 – Rosie) We are trained in how to use the analytics but… you can do brilliant against your metric but noone else might care!

Q3 – Rosie) One thing about the Agile Marketing… how do you measure the successful things….? We have 1 million Twitter followers…. we aim at a number of retweets… but what are you measuring as success.

A3 – David) Measurement for small scale actions like a post is about engagement…. we use various tools to grab that. Likes, comments or shares. for Tweets it’s replies, retweets or favourites. Poeple can get hung up on it. Reach can be useful… even if people don’t “like” it. Engagement helps us judge things… each sticky in Twillo for us is a theme, we have maybe 10 posts around the themes…. we divide clicks or comments or like by the number of page likes. So you can see the engagement proportionate size (e.g. 0.1% engagement).

Comment) our group talked about success being about getting funding for your next project!

Q4 – Christopher) This morning we talked about copyright and contributions etc. Are there examples of people working around copyright issues…

A4 – Rosie) It can be a real challenge. That can be very tricky to manage. And worse somehow as a Google Image search might well surface materials that an artist’s estate will not permit you to use or share online. At Tate we have to be really really careful about it. We are protecting artists as well as creating a great user experience. It would be good to look at themes that the artist addresses, that their work addresses, and activities for interaction broadly around that…. With Tate we did a kids activity around Lichtenstein but not branded as such, about artwork from dots. But there are things you can do… and thinking around what the artist address. That 1840s room was brilliant that we could just put the artwork out there… if only we could do that for everything… but we can’t! Getting other artists involved – a contemporary artist interested in that work – can be another way…

A4 – Tessa) I think every year the artists are becoming more flexible. When I was working 10 years ago just getting images on the website was difficult, now most artists are keen. Certain artists are particularly complex. There were moves to trademark the name “Picasso” for instance. So you have to think about this stuff first. And then you need to be creative about how address the issue. And if you are shooting video for instance then just including images you are fine to include.

A4 – David) This stuff is a creative challenge. What’s the human angle? Is there a twist? So for the Commonwealth Games we are looking at making a water cooler device with a secret beer dispenser for locals…. so there’s a human interest factor… the human interest is that there is a huge audience coming to Glasgow, will drink lots of beer, and the twist: what if we don’t want them drinking our beer…. and so voice recognition (not too complex at all – a phone, a computer, a human listening in!) will mean that those with a Scottish accent get beer, those without get water…. there’s a human angle and then using the public to give it a twist.

Q5) Thinking about sponsorship, or partnership… any examples of more creative ways to work with sponsors through the digital platforms that you have?

A5 – Rosie) Not particularly about working with sponsors. I’m not sure how interested they are about being collaborative with us…. with technology companies and developers though – as Rohan said this morning – is about a more collaborative aproach. A lot of the funding out there – the NESTA/AHRC fund for digital arts – are looking for more collaborative work here.

A5 – Tessa) We still find it hard to find sponsors for digital projects… maybe we don’t pitch it right, maybe our regular sponsors aren’t interested in digital. When we have had funding often part of the bigger funding process. I think the NESTA thing taught us the benefit of a real relationship with your digital provider. But that’s trickier with procurement processes – already a procurement type relationship. But maybe there is a need to restructure tendering processes. But the NESTA fund means you partner with the provider in the bid. But sometimes the technology provider may also own the idea… can be collaborative though. You don’t put digital to one side once done… you have to iterate.

A5 – David) Speaking from the point of view of brands. Savvy brands know that ads aren’t interesting any more, content is. Most stuff we do has cultural aspect. Markleting spend moving from ads towards content, to jointly created content. Questions here about “selling your soul to the devil” but otherwise huge potential for making content that’s genuinely engaging to audience, to customers, etc. And reach new audiences. But it’s about picking the right partners.

A5 – Rosie) we have challenges with sponsors. BP sponsor a lot of stuff but we have campaigners who oppose that. They look to us to boost their profile, but that also impacts on our too.

A5 – Tessa) And the approval too… everything needs approving for some sponsors. Really challenging for the practical arrangements.

Round up of the day

Christopher is starting to round up the day by saying that this is the sixth event in 13 months with engage. We will send round a link to the video

Sarah Yearsley, engage 

Keywords I found interesting today:

  • iteration – and the process of developing content online
  • play – really important
  • content
  • experimentation – liked hearing this. A lot of what loearning people do is about experimentation
  • failing small – making small changes and building upon them, to make bigger changes perhaps
  • be clear, think carefully – think about the benefits of what you do
  • unexpected outcomes
  • sharing models – engage, ARTIST ROOMS, and GENERATION really help here
  • digital space to meet – not just about content and structures, but spaces for people to meet
  • hidden content – loads hiddden on our website… great learning resources but can be hard to find. maybe where A/B testing comes here
  • digital fear – maybe still some of that but if we start small we can then think bigger as useful…

Sarah Yearsley, engage

Comment from David: the digital fear thing… the biggest challenge is the creativity, the ideas for content…. ironically people in this room are great for the hard bit, the content, the creativity… the technology is easier by comparison!

Back to Sarah:  And I will say what I say at the end of every event: There are some evaluation forms on this table. Please fill them in and let us know what you think. Either on paper or via SurveyMonkey.

Christopher: this event was a wee bit different to the london event because of feedback of wanting more discussion.

Sarah: the next engage event is at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. Where we will hear about how we engage with audiences away from the gallery space – in the community, through games, etc. Also a free event. Please do book and come along – 23rd April.

Finally thank you all for coming, thank you to the galleries for hosting, thanks to Nicola for blogging, and finally thanks again to all of our speakers!

And with that we are done….

Find Out More

Related Resources

The delegate pack included a wide range of resources which will be of interest both to those who attended the event, and those following the blog (only). “These online resources were suggested by contributors as background reading and reference for the seminar. The selection aims to offer some starting points; from projects that contributors have found useful and inspiring, to details of many of the projects referenced by contributors in their presentations.

Feb 142012
 

On Thursday afternoon I was at the University of Edinburgh eLearning Presentations Showcase 2011 event. This is a really lovely idea as it brings together presentations given throughout the year on or around the subject of eLearning into one afternoon. It’s a great way to catch up on colleagues’ work but also interesting from the point of view of seeing lots of varying types and styles of presentation in a packed afternoon.

Tweets about the event can still be found on the #elpp hashtag and further information and the presentations from the showcase can be found on the ELPP wiki: https://www.wiki.ed.ac.uk/display/eLPP/eLearning%20presentations%20showcase%202011.

These notes were taken as a liveblog but due to wifi issues are only being posted live now. So, although I’ve done a little tidying up, please be tolerant of typos etc. I thought it would be better to get these live quickly rather than perfectly but will try to correct any errors as they spot them. 

Wilma Alexander, Chair of the eLearning Professionals and Practitioners Forum, opened with a note that the annual eLearning at Ed conference will  be on Friday 13th April and loads of exciting programme stuff information will be live soon. With that it was right into the presentations…

 

Jo Kinsley PostGraduate Virtual Open Week at the University of Edinburgh

Jo originally presented this at the Blackboard Collaborate Connections Summit 2011 in Las Vegas.

Jo originally introduced this presentation with the background of the University mission statement and international profile. The University of Edinburgh has 26k students, many from Scotland. Of those international students at Edinburgh the largest group is from the US but 137 countries are represented in total.

This project intended to let potential students around the world the opportunity to engage with staff and attend an online open day as they are unable to attend the on campus open day. The idea came from the School of Social and Political Sciences with the idea that this would be important to students from other countries, particularly North America.

It was always intended as an alternative and additional initiative. It’s the first time this sort of project had been done in the UK on this sort of scale.

The planning… we saw this as an opportunity for a central event, here information services would be the central point for coordination. A one day turned into a full week in the end. Some schools wanted to represent the whole school, just one single programme of study. Number of staff (and in some case alumni) varied. Lots of varying technical requirements. We limited registration for academic sessions to 15 people to make it manageable and we decided to record this to see the outcomes, the attendance level etc.

Project requirements – a website, online registration, promotional planning, choosing software and training. We did most of the website central, also used an online tool on the website for registration. Comms and Marketing assisted with promotion. The software selected was Wimba and the training would be by IS.

Wimba was chosen as it is easy to use, there is no client software to install and we already had a pilot running across the university. Wimba also, via the SDK kit, made it easy to replicate classrooms quickly as there were 100s of sessions.

There were 38 staff technically trained to support sessions – Wimba did 2 hour training sessions for these staff. But we also ha 135 staff who would be hosted and/or moderating a session. The training was close to the event – took place in the training suite in the library with headsets etc. We showed them how it worked as a student and how it worked as a moderator. We gave them a role playing session to get used to the role of host, and of students, and some slides and examples to let them get a sense of using the classroom and the etiquette of the space.

We also gave them scripts – hosts with scripts, moderators with scripts etc. We gave everyone a script. People were hesitant but it worked well. We also made the staff try the experience of a participant – questions they would ask, what they would want to know – to help them get an idea of slides or notes to have to hand.

Although people were initially embarrassed etc. But after a few rotations around people really enjoyed and got into the role play. The feedback was that people weren’t sure about the time commitment or role play BUT they felt it gave them a good experience, what they could do on the day etc.

So the Virtual Open Week was 21st to 25th feb 2011. Involving 22 schools, 6 support sessions. There were about 170 unique drop in session visitors. For the academic sessions we had about 740 registered participants. We had 369 unique visitors – registered vs attendance. Roughly 50% of those who registered showed up on the day. Actually not that far off the in-person open day experience.

There was some disappointment over numbers but some great in depth discussions did take place. One chap from the dental school prepared a fantastic presentation but no-one showed up BUT he recorded the presentation and is using it as marketing on the course website.

Feedback on non attendees tended to be that they had forgotten, timings didn’t suit as well as expected, etc.

But those that attended gave great feedback. Most responded that they were slightly or significantly more likely to attend as a result. They felt it was worth while. Some said it was better than travelling to Scotland – the travesty!

Issues and lessons learned – some sessions had no preprepared information, emphasize the need for having some powerpoints to break the ice and engage attendees.

Working around admission deadlines of schools presented a timing issue.. One large event plus various school events would work.

From non attendees:

  • Reminders
  • Better account of timezone
  • And more programmes they were interested in to be included

Feedback from schools and staff has been positive. Since we did this Wimba has been in wider use across the university – PhD interviews, careers events etc. Been good for getting people used to the technology.

Q&A

Q1) would you do it again?

A1 – Jo) I would but as it happens I won’t be. But I was on the technical end, not managing the whole thing…

A1 – Fiona) It will run again on 23rd Feb as a central University thing. It will be once a month with drop in session on fees, other topics of interest etc.

Q2) It’s very important to note that on-campus that open days only attract 50% – really encouraging that online has same. Also an hour for one student is a great use of time.  And the training sessions were rather lively!

A2 – Fiona) central services found it effective – could work away then attend to students as they came in.

Q3) I used Wimba with students in Japan last year. They had some technical issues with the software. Last summer I tried it and had a problem as well. Stephen Vickers helped with that. But maybe in other countries the bandwidth can/could be an issue with using this. Especially places like China

A3 – Jo) We did put up some training/guidance and a wizard to try out Wimba before the sessions to try and help.

 

Jen Ross Partnerships and Collaborations: Future Networks of Exchange for Museums

This was originally presented with Angelina Russo (at RMIT) at ICTOP 2011 in Toronto. Jen is associate lecturer at the School of Education and works on various projects including cultural heritage.

This presentation was part of work that began as the National Museums Online Project and that led to the Digital Futures for Cultural Heritage Organisations project which ran recently. Angelina is a world expert in social media and museums – she’s not here but she says hello! Angelina is also the founder of Museum3 which is a great way to find out about digital innovation around the world.

So this talk was about how museums and cultureal heritage organisations approach social media and digital technology. As they get to grips with this they also have all sorts of organisational challenges around what expertise and authority means now. And how to be relevant in the world. The idea of exchange, the relationship between the audience and the museum as an exchange rather than top down, is something that Angelina has been working on.

So, exchange is a challenging thing for Cultural Heritage organisations (CHos) to think about. Often museums etc. have a real sense of purpose, that they are guarding “everyone’s stuff” so how  you start conversations about opening up that stuff. An exchange is a two or maybe even a three way exchange – there are exchanges between patrons/visitors as well as with the organisation.

Exchange requires people to invest in your project, in your idea. So trialling and piloting ideas can work well but if you neglect that you can lose some of the good will built up in the project.

The idea of communities of practice might be too constraining or problematic in thinking about what the relationship between museums and their audiences. It implies a shared language or a sustained engagement. It is not a realistic paradigm in the online networked world.

Instead we have been thinking about networks and flows. Organisations can trigger these but ultimately cannot control, flows of information and communication in digital space. Digital networks thrive on border crossings. What about “knotworking” (Engestrom Engestrom and Vaaho)? <another ref here too to grab>.

The digital futures of cultural heritage education project

The project had two main aims. To begin to establish a research agenda

Heritage was the biggest group, but there were a number of commercial, academic and government sectors – this is brilliant, you want to create a network of people with a shared interest but diverse needs.

I did want to iklustrate something about how twitter was used in the project. We normally think of tweets as knowledge exchange mechanism – here are five of my favourite tweets (AddressingHistory gets a mention!). But  the power of tweets also moves outside the room – presence, reach, flow…

Someone in the room asked for questions, someone else asked “how you identify your brand/institution fanatics and let them be fanatical about you?” and another person in the room summarised and replied. Artifacts move in and out of physical and virtual spaces in this sort of way. And here we see three very different people retweeting the same information to three very different audiences here.

We think that networks are a very useful and powerful way of thinking abouyt exchange in a cultureal heritage situation and a social media situation. And we nee dto think about how trust is reconfigured and strengtherned by a willingness to echange. Onus is on the institution to earn that trust through their participation with broader audienes.

You have to tie projects up when they finish – fragments on the web can reflect poorly on your institution,

Q&A

Q1) This might be premature. I can see the power of Twitter and other social spaces but they only reach a particular type/group of people but that canj provide some powerful insights into ow that moves into other digital and real spaces.

A1) That’s interesting. The DFCHE project had museums and RCAHMS etc. all part of this event. RCAHMS has had some dramatic things happen oin their education department happen as a result of these events. People working with digital things are often part of these big educational teams so are able to share that experience and develop it. In the msuems sector can be easier. But buy in from curational staff can be more tricky. Education and curation can be quite separate. Intra organisational issues can be just as profound as extra organisational issues.

Q2) Was the project combined with the resurgence of the National museums that has been going om – it feels really opened up now.

A2) We did have museums staff on the project but their refurb work was well underway. New Museology looks at the power relations within museums.

Q3) Was one project aim to raise awareness of flows and knotworking etc. in a systematic way.

A3) Yes and no. We wanted to establish a research agenda in Scotland. But we were all pleased and slightly surprised by the interest from the commercial sector so it was fantastic to see those people in those groups. Knotworking and flows it was more about what we have seen and looked back on.

 

Julie Moote & Erin Jackson Student learning in online discussions

Erin is teaching manager at the school of law. This presentation is related to the Principals teaching award. Julie originally presented this at a law education conference

Julie is a PhD candidate from the School of Education and has been working with up on the PETAS(check) project.

Julie – we are just near the end of this project, we really want to disseminate what we found. So this is a content analysis of discussion transcripts comparing synchronious and ascynchornous environments.

First step was to look at the literature of online learning. (e.g. Hara et al 2000, Heckman & Annabi,. 2005, Bliuc et al 2007,). There are real gaps in online learning environments and particularly in law learning and reasoning.

We had here main areas to look at – what is the nature of the learning taking place in online discussions – the level of cognitive engagement, the community of learners. How does the tutors online presence influence learning, the frequency of posts and the interaction betweein the students, and the final aspect – how to support a highly diverse cohort of students online? Suggestions for pedagogy, impact of legal background, language skills.

Over to Erin to introduce the elearning programmes in law. The LLM programme Innovation, technology and law, was launched in 2005/6:

There are three nominate eLLM degrees in IP Law, IT Law and Medical Law which began in 2008/9 and more are planned. There is a really diverse group of students and backgrounds here. And we do assess discussion as part of the programme – 20% usually – and discussions are led by academix tutors often with contributions with guest tutors and visiting scholars. Students value the opportunity to learn form the experiences  and insights of fellow students.

Methods

The most time consuming aspect of this project was thinking about how to analysis this content. We found an ascynchonous protocol that seemed to fit the programme. We found one and coded transcripts accordingly. Of the 30 students that consented, 9 students transcipts from the discussions were chosen fro detailed content analysis. One of the potential gaps or issues of this research was we eliminated postings from any student who had not consented so you do not get both sides of conversations often.

We found high levels of cognitive processing in discussion transcripts. They went beyond detailing factial information – connecting ideas, supporing opinions, application of judgements to different contexts. Personal interest side notes and examples etc. also were brought in.

We looked at students over 2 modules. There weren’t any obvious imporvements in discussion performance between modules 1 and 2. There didn’t seem to be a sense of tutor differences in assessment. Explicit student and outline of assumptions. We also did an in depth analysis of referenceing literature and how it was refefrenced.

We found that class size was not related to overall performance in the discussions. English languiage speakers may have a slidght advantage over non English speakers. But Lawyers fo not appear to have an advantage over non lawyers.

Limitations – we need a far larger number of students to get a sense of progression in terms of discussion. And although we used a strandard protocol it’s not well used and tested.

Conclusion s- some suggestions for pedagogy. Support for quality abd depth of student learning taking place in discussions. There are high levels of cognitive processing taking place.

Q&A

Q1) Do students have marks released between module 1 and 2

A1) Erin: Yes, they are per semester. They get grades and qualitative feedback. They should have had feedback between modules 1 and 2.

Q2) Did students get feedback on the study

A2) Julie: That’s the next step.

A2) Erin: We are looking at how we give feedback to students. Looking at how to use findings from this study to feed into that.

 

Robert Chmielewski – INTEGRATE – INTerlinking and Embedding Graduate Attributes at Edinburgh

Robert works in IS and particularly on the excellent work that has been taking place with PebblePad in the university. And this was given at the ePIC2011 (elearning Portfolios International Conference).

This was about a project that took place last year. A Scottish initiative run by AQA and HEA and this project involved Jessie Paterson (project leader), Tina Harrison, Nora Mogey, and Robert Chmielewski.

We wanted to look at graduate attributes at the university of Edinburgh. It’s a useful thing for universities to recognise the development of students etc. Lots of projects and work looking at developing this sort of reflective practice.

We identified 3 projects, one for UG, one for PGT and one for PGR students. We wanted to make a story of these that could be shared on the employability website. So three strands were recorded. Graduate attributes are crucial and link to the student experience at the university. It’s a tough choice to pick a programme of study. Many choose the wrong thing, but you learn loads of things even if you don’t want to stick with the subject you studied for your degree… so being able to pick out graduate attributes and skills is really important.

So, jumping into the first branch, for undergraduate students. This was for Divinity students – this is from Jessie. You can become a minister or a researcher at the end of your studies but most become something else. Jessie is running an Academic Skills course for 1st year undergraduates where they identify their existing skills and those they want to develop.

From the very beginning of that course students are given a framework of desirable skills and they monitor their own development against that framework. That’s a compulsory course but not assessed in a traditional meaning of that word.

If I now skip to the second strand. So these are the Postgraduate Tought students, in this case nursing studies. They use PebblePad to make sure that students are able to track their skills throughout their studies. They track their progression, they share things with tutors, and they can build up a more informed picture of their skils. We also decided to describe their journey of how eportfolios began in that department. And how these were embedded within the programme – this work will be published soon so do have a look. Quite an interesting example. All assignments are done through PebblePad and they can also do web essays instead of traditional dissertations etc. Quite exciting stuff.

The third branch is the Principals Career Development Scholarship Scheme – a series of these have been released across schools and this is exclusively for PhD research students and includes training to help them put their skills across and make more informed choices for their career paths. And look at how to engage with the rest of the world – public engagement, entrepeunership, teaching, etc.

So the picture of graduate attributes developed by the employability part of the careers service – see diagram.

So this can be shown in PebblePad and students can grade their skills in each area etc.

And an example of a webfolio from nursing studies – in this case nursing inforatics – this is something students can submit in place of a dissertation.

There is so much mojre I could tell you that is going on now – lots has progressed since this was originally presented.

Q&A

Q1) What’s happened since that project?

A1) The highlights: An aweful lot of new functionality in PebblePad that are now being used. And the user experience is hugely improved. And it looks like it may move into the School of Law for skills (not core teaching) etc. Also EUSA is working with ePortfolios now, as part of the Edinburgh Award which is recognition for non academic achievements – volunteering etc.

Q2) Is it linked with the new PEER project?

A2) Not yet. Lots of potential there and we will be expanding. It’s beginning to gain proper momentum at the moment.

A2) Nora: that group are well aware of PebblePad so those conversations are happening

Q3) What is the student feedback on PebblePad? How many students use it reflectively?

A3) Really only thoe using it as part of a structured programme in these sorts of way. Few students using it otherwise. It makes more sense with a purpose. At the moment we have about 5000 active users, but maybe less than 4000 who are properly active.  Our users are becoming users after they’ve logged in and begun using it.

 

The teaching and learning experience – a look back at the last ten years and the way ahead for the school of divinity, university of Edinburgh – Dr Jessie Paterson

This was given at HEA Subject Centre for Religious Education (check) at an event which was the last before the subject centre closed.

eLearning, as I mean it hear, is about teaching using technology usually via the web (not for us to do with teaching spaces). So very much about blended learning with very traditional lectures etc. Our approach has a strong pedagogic basis, teaching first, tool (technology) second.

Our mode of teaching is very traditional. So our Level 8 students (1st and 2nd year UG) are lecture and tutorial based. Our Level 10 and 11 students (3rd and 4th year UG and PGT are small seminar based).

We started out with our Integrated Virtual Learning Environment (IVLE) from National University of Singapore (U21 partner) as an easy entry point. At the time we looked at WebCT as a VLE and it was too complicated by comparison. But now on WebCT and about to move to Learn9 in 2012.

Initially only a few innovators used the VLE, they wanted to break traditional models a bit. Now all courses have WebCT presence. The usage very much depends on the teaching style of lecturer. The only requirement is that all essays are submitted via WebCT. Adoption based on seeing success from colleagues and also student pressure. The students pushed academics to adopt the VLE in some cases.

Resources are materials that are providing content – in differet ways, in contexts that are unusual.

So for instance we have here Katherine Rutven Seminar – historically very interesting as connected to John Knox, Mary Queen of Scots etc. So we built up this webste where her story could be explored and engaged with and combine various resources.

We also produced a Study Skills Treasure Hunt (HEA funded) – there are hugely good digital resources but students don’t know where they are. We gave students questions and missions to explore to find these resources. We still use a version of this. Students keep going back to this as a hub for finding materials.

An we also did a Special Collections resource digitisation project. There are great resources but accessing them can be tricky. So we took students physically to the library to see the real thing but then they could explore the digitised texts in full detail.

We used the Principals elearning Fund to create flash maps – this is quite a complex course that looks at the history of migration. They work well and help students understand the relationships.

This is a new resource – Jewish Non-Jewish Relations teaching resource – this is actually a new website which is a joint project between us and Canterbury University, it’s still a starting point that we’re just getting started with.

Overall comments

Think maintainability – especially with things like the flash map

Think costs compared with gains – digitisation is expensive for few texts so you need to tink this through

Tutorial and seminar preparation – it’s not about the tutorial/seminar itself, it’s a challenge to engage students to read as needed etd. So we trialled an idea of a Gobbet or Image of the Week (the Gobbet is a small bit of primary evidance).

For the Gobbet work: The students had to post this stuff to the discussion board. They could discuss it but at least they came to seminars really enthused to discuss it on the day.

For Image of the week we asked students to choose for an image that highlights the topic of the week. This again brought them engaged to class but they didn’t discuss the image ahead of time.

Blogging…

Used at all levels

Used in different ways but all have ideas around ownership – blogger versus commenter.  1st and 2nd year students use this in tutorials. A student is assigned to be the blogger and has to write fairly thoroughly on a topic, the others must comment ahead of the tutorial. For honours years blogs are used in seminars, in place of essay? These have really transformed the seminars – students are actually prepared and engaged and make the best of the face to face time.

Wiki

We use this were we want to encourage group working more formally. We’ve done two honours level trials. We put students in groups of 3 and each had to write 1000 words but the whole thing needs to have a cohersive story – some used comments on wikis and you could see development. Some work more like “blog” but have more scope in what do.

We also have a tutor support wiki – a peer support tool for tutors and they pool and add materials all the time. Loads of great sharing and tips here.

Going Forward

We’ve extended our blogging idea but combine with the ability for students to annotate and critic written texts. So can relate blog comments more readibly with the context.

Blogs have transformed tutorials and seminars and it’s been an easy and effective intervention with few technical issues.

The Wiki needs more management, students can find the medium difficult – the technology can be a real barrier. I’m excited to see how the Learn9 wiki works.

Assessment and Feedback

Predominantly essay based but course work do include blog, wiki, tutorial sheet assessment. Now have guidance on non traditional modes, A lot of our work is on paper, marking is usually on paper, but we do use Turnitin and I think staff will quickly adapt to marking/giving feedback online

Exams on computers

We offer some courses students choice typing or hand writing final exam, only alteration from traditional exams. Doing research on this as we go and have only been using 2 years so far. Exam4 by Externity. Student uptake has been quite low so far. But uptake increasing. And a growth there. A lot to do with confidence.

Autumated textual analusis – we’re looking at help that would be automatic to give idea of needing more referencing, grammar etc. It’s not about marking of text but improvement of pre-submission work. Working with Informatics on this.

We’re also doing more work on why uptake of typing by students is low.

Overall comments

Marking criteria non-traditional modeas need to be clear – implications for common marking scheme and our working group here has made quite a difference.

Exams on computers – think they’ll be an increase of uptake. Some infrastructure issues here – need power at every desk, more space etc.

And we’ve like to be able to give formative feedback on student essays as well.

Academic Skills Course

This is totally online for timetabling reasons. The idea is to ensure all students have basic skill set that they need. They work in their own time. It’s a mixture online resources and it’s non assessed.

We have now embedded Graduate Attributes into that course. We try to get them to write in semi-formal styles, and that is an attribute, speaking in tutorials etc. We are trying to help them to think about that skill and demonstrating that they have these skills.  And starting to use PebblePad.

Pre-arrival skills

We piloted in 2011-2012 we’ve shared this material ahead of arrival. When is a student really a student – A-Level results don’t come out until August, hard to define when they start. So we have a light touch graduate attrivute – two defined areas – academic writing and tutorials. Lots of skills bound up here. So those umbrellas let us bundle all those skills. These resources need to help and be encouraging – don’t want to put people off.

Some issues of the Academic Skills course though. The fact that it’s a discreet course. And studet engagement and sustainable engagement – making it compulsory has radically helped.

Other areas

First year learners experience project. We worked with STEER tracing of VLE usage – with Physics. WebCT doesn’t track everything you’d like really. And we are looking at student technology ownership and issues/opportunities around that.

In the future we are thinking now about distance education. Employability is becoming a growing issue – particularly as course fees  rise. Very few people come to be church ministers and they go on to a whole range of careers – and it’s the skills that enable that. Mobile U@Ed – we will be keeping an eye on. And Flexible learning.

Q&A

Q1) First of all I was thinking about how fantastic the work you are doing at Divinity is, it’s inspiring! I was wondering about whether you care about sharing study skills with those pre-admission students of any type – other students that don’t come here may value them

Q2) It all depends on the definition of the student – that really matters from a library/publishers point of view. That’s for us to deal with here. Preparation for university is so much about using the library

A2) we really want our students using both the physical and electronic resources of the library.

A2) Christine: Students know they are welcome to come to the library, using a visitor card. Some of our licenced resouerces do allow access for non registered students so perhaps we can give students a taster to work with that. And the library catalogue is completely free of course.

Comment) you could probably stage it so some parts are fine for all, other levels are only for registered students.

Comment) Students do arrive looking or flats and other stuff early, they show up at the library and need that card, that proof of ID for those rental and council tax type things as well. They don’t know when they are a student.

A2) It’s a huge issue.

A2) Wilma: I’ve just become a matriculated student and we are not clear about what we want them to do, what instructions to follow.

 

“That ever ephemeral sense of being somewhere” – Reflections on a dissertation Festival in Second Life – Clara O Shea and Mashall Dozier

This is to be presented at Experiential Learning in Virtual Worlds in Prague in 2012. More on the Dissertation Festival can be found here: http://www.elearning.education.ed.ac.uk/events/ and images can be viewed at: http://tinyurl.com/3ap3v32.

Clara teaches on the MSc in eLearning course with various colleagues,  including Marshall. So first off… the programme has about 150 students. About half UK, quarter EU and a quarter other parts of the World. We use Second Life and Twitter and Wiki and Adobe Connect and blogs and a social networking sites, a whole range of stuff. It’s awesome!

But then… students come to the dissertation… after all that aswesome collaboration they are alone and by themselves. They are doing a research projects on their own. They have a bit of a culture shock. And few people will do a similar topic. It can be quite a lonely and isolating experience.

So we thought that would be sort of a need to solve that problem and were thinking about what might work, drawing on our experiences. So we wanted to give people a cjance to get together. But students are very busy professionals. So we need those meetings to be synchronous and asynchronous. We wanted multiple ways to articulate an argument. We wanted sharing and exchange, to feel part of the environment, and to use some of these environments.

So – ta da!  – we wanted to do a Dissertation Festival – inspired by Japanese cherry blossom and Koi fish type festival ideas. So… over to Marshall…

Fiona Littletone raised part of our MSc in eLearning Second Life present out of the sea and made a space where students could share a poster of what the students were trying to address, and then visitors could leave comments, suggestions etc. for each presenter. And also we have them write a haiku summarising their dissertation. These were ways to succinctly describe their dissertation or research.

Clara again. We had  students as guinea pigs for this. The display was up for several weeks and we also had synchronous sessions where the presenters could explain their work.

The feedback boards and comments were useful – students found the summative nature of the displays very helpful, the feedback was great but also made some students feel exposed or a sense of risk.

So for the synchronous sessions we used voice to speak to the audience, the audience mainly used text. A bit like Twitter at conferences. Some of the Second Life “casual” poses tell you very little – so the audience can type “nodding” or “agreement” – some cues but not really disruptive. That seemed to work quite well.

Speakers could also respond in real time – very dynamic. It felt like a real experience of presenting to the student, it had meaning.

On the first day we also had a synchronous session in text for students to discuss the dissertation process – asking questions both straightforward and more complex. Also students not at that stage yet as well. And a champagne poster viewing session (that;s virtual champagne btw).

Students liked the chance to share. Students commented on the invisible blending of tutors and students. We had quite in depth discussion with people who attended. One commented about how nice it was to have tutors there. Another commented that they would have liked to have students there – there was a difference as the usernames aren’t obvious and that really flattens the hierarchy and gives a real sense of community.

Over to Marshall again…

We tried to make this feel like a party – we had sushi and champagne etc. (all virtual). The students said it felt like a group of friends – like discussion boards on steroids according to one syudent. One student said they think of the Uni on SL as a safe space. The wine and sushi gave a sense of presence to on estudent. And another commented that having that space was far nicer than emailing posters around.

The students who attended were current and past student s, some staff and ab outsider. And that was a nice number – like an in person seminar number. It felt very special. It was done in August when things are a bit quiet for students. Just before the restart of courses it sort of warmed people up. Partly we think its partly about how we use SL in the programme – coming together for fun tutorials but also graduations and Christmas parties etc. And that stuff – the sushi and wine and stuff all adds to that great environment. It’s all playful and special. The behaviours we model is very chatty and informal, that makes a difference. The flatterned hierarchy makes a difference. And that synchronous but not exclusionary interaction. And there’s a sense of “hard fun”.

Q&A

Q1) At what stage were these students?

A1) Different stages – one was writing up and using it to get thoughts in line. One student thought she was further along then she was. She was able to have a reflective moment and get a better sense of her own journey. Another was heading to get stuck. And another had completed and we were just finding out what he’d been up to. We’ve decided to run it once every year. Maybe slightly earlier in August than they were before. But not just people about to hand in. Good kick up the pants.

Comment) All our students hand in at the same time.

A1) Thinking about the idea of exemplars of student work – you show both good and bad work and the range of ideas. I’d like to encourage more students in, those that are a year off say.

A1 – Marshall) Some students were taking a year off and this got them excited about coming back

A1 – Clara) We have a lot of students who get excited about handing in and want things to do over the summer

Q2) IS it still up?

A2 – Marshall) It is down so we can use the space for Innovative Learning Week

A2 – Clara) We left it up for a couple monhs but you can find the Flickr pictures as well.

Comment – Jen Ross) It’s radically asynchronous. A student this semester asked something and it reminded me of one of the boards up on SL and those students have now been discussing their research. Also Clara said “we” but this was her vision.

Comment – Fiona Littleton) We are looking at doing something similar with the Vet school and extending  a physical poster session they do there to SL.

A2 – Marshall) And it would be great to have an archive as well!

And with that we were done for the day…