Nov 242016
 

This morning I’m at the Edinburgh Tourism Action Group‘s Digital Solutions for Tourism Conference 2016. Why am I along? Well EDINA has been doing some really interesting cultural heritage projects for years, particularly Curious Edinburgh – history of science tours app and our citizen science apps for COBWEBFieldTrip Open which are used by visitors to locations, not just residents. And of course services like Statistical Accounts of Scotland which have loads of interest from tourists and visitors to Scotand. We are also looking at new mobile, geospatial, and creative projects so this seems like a great chance to hear what else is going on around tourism and tech in Edinburgh.

Introduction James McVeigh, Head of Marketing and Innovation, Festivals Edinburgh

Welcome to our sixth Digital Solutions for Tourism Conference. In those last six years a huge amount has changed, and our programme reflects that, and will highlight much of the work in Edinburgh, but also picking up what is taking place in the wider world, and rolling out to the wider world.

So, we are in Edinburgh. The home of the world’s first commercially available mobile app – in 1999. And did you also know that Edinburgh is home to Europe’s largest tech incubator? Of course you do!

Welcome Robin Worsnop, Rabbie’s Travel, Chair, ETAG

We’ve been running these for six years, and it’s a headline event in the programme we run across the city. In the past six years we’ve seen technology move from business add on to fundamental to what we do – for efficiency, for reach, for increased revenue, and for disruption. Reflecting that change this event has grown in scope and popularity. In the last six years we’ve had about three and a half thousand people at these events. And we are always looking for new ideas for what you want to see here in future.

We are at the heart of the tech industry here too, with Codebase mentioned already, Sky Scanner, and the School of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh all of which attracts people to the city. As a city we have free wifi around key cultural venues, on the buses, etc. It is more and more ubiquitous for our tourists to have access to free wifi. And technology is becoming more and more about how those visitors enhance their visit and experience of the city.

So, we have lots of fantastic speakers today, and I hope that you enjoy them and you take back lots of ideas and inspiration to take back to your businesses.

What is new in digital and what are the opportunities for tourism Brian Corcoran, Director, Turing Festival

There’s some big news for the tech scene in Edinburgh today: SkyScanner have been brought by a Chinese company for 1.5bn. And FanDual just merged with its biggest rival last week. So huge things are happening.

So, I thought today technology trends and bigger trends – macro trends – might be useful today. So I’ll be looking at this through the lens of the companies shaping the world.

Before I do that, a bit about me, I have a background in marketing and especially digital marketing. And I am director of the Turing Festival – the biggest technology festival in Scotland which takes place every August.

So… There are really two drivers of technology… (1) tech companies and (2) users. I’m going to focus on the tech companies primarily.

The big tech companies right now include: Uber, disrupting the transport space; Netflix – for streaming and content commissioning; Tesla – dirupting transport and energy usage; Buzzfeed – influential with huge readership; Spotify – changing music and music payments; banking… No-one has yet dirupted banking but they will soon… Maybe just parts of banking… we shall see.

And no-one is influencing us more than the big five. Apple, mainly through the iPhone. I’ve been awaiting a new MacBook for five years… Apple are moving computing PCs for top end/power users, but also saying most users are not content producers, they are passive users – they want/expect us to move to iPads. It’s a mobile device (running iOS) and a real shift. iPhone 7 got coverage for headphones etc. but cameras didn’t get much discussion, but it is basically set up for augmented reality with two cameras. Air Pods – the cable-less headphones – is essentially a new wearable, like/after the iWatch. And we are also seeing Siri opening up.

Over at Google… Since Google’s inception the core has been search and the Google search index and ranking. And they are changing it for the first time ever really… And building a new one… They are building a Mobile-only search index. They aren’t just building that they are prioritising it. Mobile is really the big tech trend. And in line with that we have their Pixel phone – a phone they are manufacturing themselves… That’s getting them back into wearables after their Google Glass misstep. And Google Assistant is another part of the Pixel phone – a Siri competitor… Another part of us interacting with phones, devices, data, etc. in a new way.

Microsoft is one of the big five that some thing shouldn’t be there… They have made some missteps… They missed the internet. They missed – and have written off phones (and Nokia). But they have moved to Surface – another mobile device. They have abandoned Windows and moved to Microsoft 365. They brought LinkedIn for £26bn (in cash!). One way this could effect us… LinkedIn has all this amazing data… But it is terrible at monetising it. That will surely change. And then we have HoloLens – which means we may eventually have some mixed reality actually happening.

Next in the Big Five is Amazon. Some very interesting things there… We have Alexa – the digital assistant service here. They have, as a device, Echo – essentially a speaker and listening device for your home/hotel etc. Amazon will be in your home listening to you all the time… I’m not going to get there! And we have Amazon Prime… And also Prime Instant Video. Amazon moving into television. Netflix and Amazon compete with each other, but more with traditional TV. And moving from Ad income to subscriptions. Interesting to think where TV ad spend will go – it’s about half of all ad spend.

And Facebook. They are at ad saturation risk, and pushing towards video ads. With that in mind they may also become defacto TV platform. Do they have new editorial responsibility? With Fake News etc. are they a tech company? Are they a media company? At the same time they are caving completely to Chinese state surveillance requests. And Facebook are trying to diversify their ecosystem so they continue to outlast their competitors – with Instagram, WhatsApp, Oculus, etc.

So, that’s a quick look at tech companies and what they are pushing towards. For us, as users the big moves have been towards messaging – Line, Wiichat, Messaging, WhatsApp, etc. These are huge and there has been a big move towards messaging. And that’s important if we are trying to reach the fabled millennials as our audience.

And then we have Snapchat. It’s really impenetrable for those under 30. They have 150 Daily Active Users, they have 1 bn snaps daily, 10bn videos daily. They are the biggest competitor to Facebook, to ad revenue. They have also gone for wearables – in a cheeky cool upstart way.

So, we see 10 emergent patterns:

  1. Mobile is now *the* dominant consumer technology, eclipsing PCs. (Apple makes more from the iPhone than all their other products combined, it is the most successful single product in history).
  2. Voice is becoming in an increasingly important UI. (And interesting how answers there connect to advertising).
  3. Wearables bring tech into ever-closer physical and psychological proximity to us. It’s now on our wrist, or face… Maybe soon it will be inside you…
  4. IoT is getting closer, driven by the intersection of mobile, wearables, APIs and voice UI. Particularly seeing this in smart home tech – switching the heat on away from home is real (and important – it’s -3 today), but we may get to that promised fridge that re-orders…
  5. Bricks and mortar retail is under threat, and although we have some fulfillment challenges, they will be fixed.
  6. Messaging marks generational shift in communification preferences – asynchronous prferred
  7. AR and VR will soon be commonplace in entertainment – other use cases will follow… But things can take time. Apple watch went from unclear use case to clear health, sports, etc. use case.
  8. Visual cmmunications and replacing textural ones for millenials: Snapchat defines that.
  9. Media is increasingly in the hands of tech companies – TV ads will be disrupted (Netflix etc.)
  10. TV and ad revenue will move to Facebook, Snapchat etc.

What does this all mean?

Mobile is crucial:

  • Internet marketing in tourism now must be mobile-centric
  • Ignore Google mobile index at your peril
  • Local SEO is increasing in importance – that’s a big opportunity for small operators to get ahead.
  • Booking and payments must be designed for mobile – a hotel saying “please call us”, well Millennials will just say no.

It’s unclear where new opportunities will be, but they are coming. In Wearables we see things like twoee – wearable watches as key/bar tab etc. But we are moving to a more seamless place.

Augmented reality is enabling a whole new set of richer, previously unavailable interactive experiences. Pokemon Go has opened the door to location-based AR games. That means previously unexciting places can be made more engaging.

Connectivity though, that is also a threat. The more mobile and wearables become conduits to cloud services and IoT, the more the demand for free, flawless internet connectivity will grow.

Channels? Well we’ve always needed to go where the market it. It’s easier to identify where they are now… But we need to adapt to customers behaviours and habits, and their preferences.

Moore’s law: overall processing power for computers will double every two year (Gordon Moore, INTEL, 1965)… And I wonder if that may also be true for us too.

Shine the Light – Digital Sector

Each of these speakers have just five minutes…

Joshua Ryan-Saha, Skills Lead, The Data Lab – data for tourism

I am Skills Lead at The Data Lab, and I was previously looking at Smart Homes at Nesta. The Data Lab works to find ways that data can benefit business, can benefit Scotland, can benefit your work. So, what can data do for your organisation?

Well, personalised experiences… That means you could use shopping habits to predict, say, a hotel visitors preferences for snacks or cocktails etc. The best use I’ve seen of that is in a museum using heart rate monitors to track experience, and areas of high interest. And as an exhibitor you can use phone data to see how visitors move around, what do they see, etc.

You can also use data in successful marketing – Tripadvisor data being a big example here.

You can also use data in efficient operations – using data to ensure things are streamlined. Things like automatic ordering – my dentist did this.

What can data do for Tourism in Scotland? Well we did some work with Glasgow using SkyScanner data, footfall data, etc. to predict hotel occupancy rates and with machine learning and further data that has become quite accurate over time. And as you start to predict those patterns we can work towards seamless experience. At the moment our masters students are running a competition around business data and tourism – talk to me to be involved as I think a hack in that space would be excellent.

What can data lab do for you? Well we fund work – around £70k per project, also smaller funds. We do skills programmes, masters and Phd students. And we have expertise – data scientists who can come in and work with you to sort your organisation a bit. If you want to find out more, come and talk to me!

Brian Smillie, Beezer – app creation made affordable and easy

1 in 5 people own a smart phone, desktop is a secondary touchpoint. The time people spend using mobile app has increased 21% since last year. There are 1 bn websites, only 2 million apps. Why are business embracing mobile apps? Well speed and convenience are key – an app enables 1 click access. Users expect that. And they can also reduce staff time on transations, etc. It allows building connection, build loyalty… Wouldn’t it be great to be able to access that. But the cost can be £10k or more per single app. When I was running a digital agency in Australia I heard the same thing over and over again – that they had spent a small fortune then no-one downloaded it. Beezer enables you to build an app in a few hours, without an app store, and it works on any platforms. SMEs need a quick, cheap, accessible way to build apps and right now Beezer are the only ones who do this…

Ben Hutton, XDesign – is a mobile website enough?

I’m Ben from XDesign – we build those expensive apps Brian was just talking about… A few years ago I was working on analytics of purchasing and ads… I was working on that Crazy Frog ad… We found the way that people would download that ringtone was to batter people into submission, showing it again again again… And that approach has distorted mobile apps and their potential. But actually so has standardised paper… We are so used to A4 that it is the default digital size too… It was a good system for paper merchants in the C17th. It has corrupted the ideas we have about apps… We think that apps are extensions of those battering/paper skillsets.

A mobile phone is a piece of engineering, software that sits in your pocket. It requires software engineers, designers, that will ensure quality assurance, that is focused on that medium. We have this idea of the Gigabit Society… We have 4.5G, the rocket fuel for mobile… And it’s here in London, in Manchester, in Birmingham… It is coming… And to work with that we need to think about the app design. It isn’t meant to be easy. You have to know about how Google is changing, about in-app as well as app sales, you need to know deep linking. To build a successful app you need to understand that you don’t know what you are doing but you have to give it a try anyway… That’s how we got to the moon!

Chris Torres, Director, Senshi Digital – affordable video

We develop tourism brands online to get the most out of online, out of sales. And I’ve been asked today to talk specifically about video. Video has become one of the best tools you can use in tourism. One of the reasons is that on your website or social media if you use video your audience can learn about your offering 60k times faster than if they read your content.

The average user watches 32 videos per month; 79% of travellers search YouTube for travel ideas – and many of them don’t know where they are going. By 2018 video will be 84% of web traffic. And it can really engage people.

So what sort of video do we do? Well we do background video for homepages… That can get across the idea of a place, of what they will experience when they get to your tourism destination.

What else? Staff/tour guide videos is huge. We are doing this for Gray Line at the moment and that’s showing a big uptick in bookings. When people see a person in a video, then meet at your venue, that’s a huge connection, very exciting.

We also have itinerary videos, what a customer can experience on a tour (again my example is Gray Line).

A cute way to do this is to get customers to supply video – and give them a free tour, or a perk – but get them to share their experiences.

And destination videos – it’s about the destination, not neccassarily you, your brand, your work – just something that entices customers to your destination.

Video doesn’t need to be expensive. You can film on your iPhone. But also you can use stock supplies for video – you’ve no excuse not to use video!

Case Study – Global Treasure Apps and Historic Environment Scotland Lorraine Sommerville and Noelia Martinez, Global Treasure Apps

Noella: I am going to talk about the HES project with Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh College, Young Scot. The project brought together young people and cultural heritage information. The process is a co-production process, collecting images, information, stories and histories of the space with the Global Treasure Apps, creating content. The students get an idea of how to create a real digital project for a real client. (Cue slick video on this project outlining how it worked).

Noella: So, the Global Treasure Apps are clue driven trails, guiding visitors around visitor attractions. For this Edinburgh Castle project we had 20 young people split into 5 groups. They researched at college and drafted trails around the space. Then they went to the castle and used their own mobile devices to gather those digital assets. And we ended up with 5 trails for the castle that can be used. Then, we went back to the college, uploaded content to our database, and then set the trails live. Then we go ESOL students to test the trails, give feedback and update it.

Lorraine: Historic Environment Scotland were delighted with the project, as were Edinburgh College. We are really keen to expand this to other destinations, especially as we enter The Year of Young People 2018, for your visitors and destinations.

Apps that improve your productivity and improve your service Gillian Jones, Qikserve

Before I start I’m going to talk a wee bit about SnapChat… SnapChat started as a sexting app… And I heard about it from my mum – but she was using it for sharing images of her house renovation! And if she can use that tech in new ways, we all can!

I am from Edinburgh and nothing makes me happier than seeing a really diverse array of visitors coming to this city, and I think that SkyScanner development will continue to see that boom.

A few months ago I was in Stockholm. I walked out of the airport and saw a fleet of Teslas as their taxis. It was a premium, innovative, thing to see. I’m not saying we should do that here, I’m saying the tourist experience starts from the moment they see the city, especially the moment that they arrive. And, in this day and age, if I was to guest coming to a restaurant, hotel, etc. what would I want? What would I see? It’s hard as a provider to put yourself in your customers shoes. How do we make tourists and guests feel welcome, feel able to find what they need. Where do we want to go and how to get there? There is a language barrier. There is unfamiliar cuisine – and big pictorial menus aren’t always the most appealing solution.

So, “Francesco” has just flown to Edinburgh from Rome. He speaks little English but has the QikServe app, he can see all the venues that uses that. He’s impatient as he has a show to get to. He is in a rush… So he looks at a menu, in his native language on his phone – and can actually find out what haggis or Cullen Skink is. And he is prompted there for wine, for other things he may want. He gets his food… And then he has trouble finding  a waiter to pay. He wants to pay by Amex – a good example of ways people want to pay, but operators don’t want to take – But in the app he can pay. And then he can share his experience too. So, you have that local level… If they have a good experience you can capitalise on it. If they have a bad experience, you can address it quickly.

What is the benefit of this sort of system? Well money for a start. Mobile is proven for driving up sales – I’ve ordered a steak, do I want a glass of red with that? Yeah, I probably do. So it can increase average transaction value. It can reduce pressure on staff during busy times, allowing them to concentrate on great service. That Starbucks app – the idea of ordering ahead and picking up – is normal now…  You can also drive footfall by providing information in tourists native language. And you can upsell, cross sell and use insights for more targeted campaigns – more sophisticated than freebies, and more enticing. It is about convenience tailored to me. And you can keen your branding at the centre of the conversation, across multiple channels.

There are benefits for tourists here through greater convenience with reduced wait-ties and queues; by identifying restaurant of choice and order in native language and currency; find and navigate to restaurant of choice with geo-location capabilities; order what you want, how you want it with modifiers, upsell and cross sell prompts in native language – we are doing projects in the US with a large burger chain who are doing brilliantly because of extra cheese ordered through the app!; and you can easily share and recommend experience through social media.

We work across the world but honestly nothing would make me happier than seeing us killing it in Edinburgh!

Virtual reality for tourism Alexander Cole, Peekabu Studios

Thank you for having me along, especially in light of recent US events (Alex is American).

We’ve talked about mobile. But mobile isn’t one thing… There are phones, there have been robot sneakers, electronic photo frames, all sorts of things before that are now mixed up and part of our phones. And that’s what we are dealing with with VR. Screens, accelerometers, buttons have all been there for a while! But if I show you what VR looks like… Well… It’s not like an app or a film or something, it’s hard to show. You look like a dork using it…

VR is abou

Right now VR is a $90m industry (2014) but by 2018 we expect it to be at least $5.2bn, and 171m users – and those are really conservative estimates.

So, VR involves some sort of headset… Like an HTC Vive, or Oculus Rift, etc. They include an accelorometer to see where you are looking, tilting, turning. Some include additional sensors. A lot of these systems have additional controllers, that detect orientation, presses, etc. that means the VR knows where I am, where I’m looking, what I’m doing with my hands. It’s great, but this is top end. This is about £1000 set up AND you need a PC to render and support all of this.

But this isn’t the only game in town… Google have the “Daydream” – a fabric covered mobile phone headset with lens. They also have the Google Cardboard. In both cases you have a phone, strap in, and you have VR. But there are limitations… It doesn’t track your movement… But it gives you visuals, it tracks how you turn, and you can create content from your phones – like making photospheres – image and audio – when on holiday.

Capture is getting better, not just on devices. 360 degree cameras are now just a few hundred pounds, you can take it anywhere, it’s small and portable and that makes for pretty cool experiences. So, if you want to climb a tower (Alex is showing a vertigo-inducing Moscow Tower video), you can capture that, you can look down! You can look around. For tourism uses it’s like usual production – you bring a camera, and you go to a space, and you show what you would like, you just do it with a 360 degree camera. And you can share it on YouTube’s 360 video channel…

And with all of this tech together you can set up spaces where sensors are all around that properly track where you are and give much more immersive emotional experiences… Conveying emotion is what VR does better than anything when it is done well.

So, you can do this two ways… You can create content so that someone not in a particular physical space, can feel they are there. OR you can create a new space and experience that. It requires similar investment of time and effort. It’s much like video creation with a little more stitching together that is required.

So, for example this forthcoing space game with VR is beautiful. But that’s expensive. But for tourism the production can be more about filming – putting a camera in a particular place. And, increasingly, that’s live. But, note…

You still look like a ninny taking place! That’s a real challenge and consideration in terms of distribution, an dhow many people engage at the same time… But you can use that too – hence YouTube videos all usually including both what’s on screen, and what’s going on (the ninny view).  And now you have drones and drone races with VR used by the controller… That’s a vantage point you cannot get any other way. That is magical and the cost is not extortionate… You can take it further than this… You can put someone in a rig with wings, with fans, with scents, and with VR, so you can fly around and experience a full sensory experience… This is stupid expensive… But it is the most awesome fun! It conveys a sense of doing that thing VR was always meant to do. When we talk about where VR is going… We have rollercoasters with VR – so you can see Superman flying around you. There are some on big elastic bands – NASA just launched one for Mars landing.

So, tourism and VR is a really interesting marriage. You can convey a sense of place, without someone being there. Even through 360 degree video, YouTube 360 degree video… And you can distribute it in more professional way for Vive, for Oculus Rift… And when you have a space set up, when you have all those sensors in a box… That’s a destination, that’s a thing you can get people too. There is a theme park destination like experiences. You can service thousands+ people with one set up and one application.

So, the three E’s of VR: experience, exploration – you drive this; and emotion – nothing compares to VR for emotion. Watching poeple use VR for the first time is amazing… They have an amazing time!

But we can’t ignore the three A’s of VR: access – no one platform, and lots of access issues; affordability – the biggest most complex units are expensive, your customers won’t have one, but you can put it in your own space; applicability – when you have new tech you can end up treating everything as a nail for your shiny new hammer. Don’t have your honeymoon in VR. Make sure what you do works for the tech, for the space, for the audience’s interest.

Using Data and Digital for Market Intelligence for Destinations and Businesses Michael Kessler, VP Global Sales, Review Pro

I’m going to be talking about leveraging guest intelligence to deliver better experiences and drive revenue. And this isn’t about looking for “likes”, it’s about using data to improve revenue, to develop business.

So, for an example of this, we analysed 207k online reviews in 2016 year to date for 339 3*, 4* and 5* hotels in Glasgow and Edinburgh. We used the Global Review Index (GRI) – which we developed and is an industry-standard reputation score based on review data collected from 175+ OTAs and review sites in over 45 languages. To do that we normalise scores – everyone uses their own scale. From that data we see Edinburgh’s 5* hotels have 90.2% satisfaction in Edinburgh (86.4% in Glasgow), and we can see the variance by * rating (Glasgow does better for satisfaction at 3*).

You can explore satisfaction by traveler types – solo, couples, families, business. The needs are very different. For any destination or hotel this lets you optimise your business, to understand and improve what we do.

We run sentiment analysis, using machine learning, across reviews. We do this by review but also aggregate it so that you can highlight strengths and weaknesses in the data. We show you trends… You will understand many of these but those trends allow you to respond and react to those trends (e.g. Edinburgh gets great scores on Location, Staff, Reception; poorer scores on Internet; Bathroom; Technology. Glasgow gets great Location, Staff, Reception, poorer scores for Internet, Bathroom; Room). We do this across 16 languages and this is really helpful.

We also highlight management response rates. So if guests post on TripAdvisor, you have to respond to them. You can respond and use as a marketing channel too. Looking across Edinburgh and Glasgow we can see a major variation between (high) response rates to TripAdvisor versus (low) response to Booking.com or Expedia.

The old focus of marketing was Product/Promotion/Price/Place. But that has changed forever. It’s all about experience now. That’s what we want. I think we have 4 Es instead of 4 Ps. So, those 4E’s are: Experience; Evangelism; Exchange; Everyplace. In the past I shared experience with friends and families, but now I evangelise, I share much more widely. And everyplace reflects sending reviews too – 60-70% of all reviews and feedback to accommodation is done via mobile. You can’t make better marketing than authentic feedback from guests, from customers.

And this need to measure traveller experience isn’t just about hotels/hostels/services apartments, it is also about restaurants; transportation; outdoor attractions; theme parks; museums; shopping. And those reviews have a solid impact on revenue – 92% of travelers indicate that their decisions are highly influenced by reviews and ratings.

So, how do we use all this data? Well there is a well refined cycle: Online reviews; we can have post-stay/event surveys; and in-stay surveys. Online reviews and post-stay surveys are a really good combination to understand what can be improved, where change can be made. And using that cycle you can get to a place of increased guest satisfaction, growth in review volume, improved online rankings (TripAdvisor privileges more frequently reviewed places for instance), and increased revenue.

And once you have this data, sharing it across the organisation has a huge positive value, to ensure the whole organisation is guest-centric in their thinking and practice.

So, we provide analytics and insights for each of your departments. So, for housekeeping, what happened in the room space in reviews; we can do semantic data checking for cleanliness, clean, etc.

In-stay reviews also helps reduce negative reviews – highlighting issues immediately, make the experience great whilst your guest is still there. And we have talked about travellers being mobile, but our solution is also mobile so that we can use it in all spaces.

How else can we use this? We can use it to increase economic development by better understanding our visitors. How do we do this? Well for instance in Star Ratings Australia we have been benchmarking hotel performances across 5000+ hotels across a range of core KPIs. Greece (SETE) is a client of ours and we help them to understand how they as a country, as cities, as islands, compete with other places and cities across the world.

So our system works for anyone with attractions, guests, reviews, clients, where we can help. Operators can know guests – but that’s opinion. We try to enable decisions based on real information. That allows understanding of weaknesses and drive change. There is evidence that increasing your Global Review Index level will help you raise revenue. It also lets you refine your marketing message based on what you perform best at in your reviews, make a virtue of your strengths on your website, on TripAdvisor, etc.

And with reviews, do also share reviews on your own site – don’t just encourage them to go to Tripadvisor. Publishing reviews and ratings means your performance is shown without automatically requiring an indirect/fee-occuring link, you keep them on your site. And you do need to increase review volume on key channels to keep your offering visible and well ranked.

So, what do we offer?

We have our guest intelligence system, with reputation management, guest surveys, revenue optimiser and data. All of these create actionable insights for a range of tourism providers – hotels, hostels, restaurants, businesses etc. We have webinars, content, and information that we share back with the community for free.

Tech Trends and the Tourism Sector

Two talks here…

Jo Paulson, Events and Experiences Manager, Edinburgh Zoo and Jon-Paul Orsi, Digital Manager, Edinburgh Zoo – Pokemon Go

Jon-Paul: As I think everyone knows Pokemon Go appeared and whether you liked it or not it was really popular. So we wanted to work out what we could do. We are spread over a large site and that was great – loads of pokestops – but an issue too: one was in our blacksmith shop, another in our lion enclosure! So we quickly mapped the safe stops and made that available – and we only had a few issues there. By happy accident we also had some press coverage as one of the best places to find Pokemon – because a visitor happened to have found a poketung on our site.

With that attention we also decided to do some playful things with social media – making our panda a poke-cake; sharing shots of penguins and pokemon. And they were really well received.

Jo: Like many great ideas we borrowed from other places for some of our events. Bristol zoos had run some events and we borrowed ideas – with pokestops, pokedex charging points, and we had themed foods, temporary tattoos etc. We wanted to capitalise on the excitement so we had about a week and a half to do this. As usual we checked with keepers first, closing off areas where the animals could be negatively impacted.

Jon-Paul: In terms of marketing this we asked staff to tell their friends… And we were blown away by how well that went. On August 4th we had 10k hits as they virally shared the details. We kind of marketed it by not marketing it publicly. It being a viral, secret, exciting thing worked well. We sold out in 2 hours and that took us hugely be surprise. Attendees found the event through social primarily – 69% through facebook, 19% by word of mouth.

We didn’t have a great picture of demographics etc. Normally we struggle to get late teens, twenties, early thirties unless they are there as a couple or date. But actually here we saw loads of people in those age ranges.

Jo: We had two events, both of which we kept the zoo opened later than usual. Enclosures weren’t open – though you could see the animals. But it was a surreal event – very chatty, very engaged, and yet a lot of heads down without animal access. For the first event we gave away free tickets, but asked for donations (£5k) and sold out in 2 hours; for the second event we charged £5 in advance (£6500) and sold in around a week. We are really pleased with that though, that all goes into our conservation work. If popularity of Pokemon continues then we will likely run more of these as we reach the better weather/longer light again.

Rob Cawston, Interim Head of Digital Media, National Museum of Scotland – New Galleries and Interactive Exhibitions

One of the advantages of having a 7 year old son is that you can go to Pokemon Go events and I actually went to the second Zoo event which was amazing, if a little Black Mirror.

Here at the NMS we’ve just completed a major project opening 4 new fashion and design galleries, 6 new science and technology galleries, and a new piazza (or expanded pavement if you like). Those ten new galleries allow us to show (75% of 3000+) items for the first time in generations, but we also wanted to work out how to engage visitors in these attractions. So, in the new galleries we have 150+ interactive exhibits in the new galleries – some are big things like a kid sized hamster wheel, hot air balloon, etc. But we also now have digital labels… This isn’t just having touch screens for the sake of it, it needed to add something new that enhances the visitor experience. We wanted to reveal new perspectives, to add fun and activity – including games in the gallery, and providing new knowledge and learning.

We have done research on our audiences and they don’t just want more information – they have phones, they can google stuff, so they want more. And in fact the National Museum of Flight opened 2 new hangers and 30 new digital labels that let us trial some of our approaches with visitors first.

So, on those digital labels and interactives we have single stories, multiple chapters, bespoke interactives. These are on different sorts of screens, formats, etc. Now we are using pretty safe tech. We are based on the umbraco platform, as is our main website. We set up a CMS with colours, text, video, etc. And that content is stored on particular PCs that send data to specific screens in the museums. There is so much content going into the museum, so we were able to prep all this stuff ahead of gallery opening, and without having to be in the gallery space whilst they finished installing items.

We didn’t just put these in the gallery – we put them on the website too. Our games are there, and we know they are a major driver of traffic to the website. That multiple platform digital content includes 3D digital views of fashion; we have a game built with Aardman…

We have learned a lot from this. I don’t think we realised how much would be involved in creating this content, and I think we have created a new atmosphere of engagement. After this session do go and explore our new galleries, our new interactives, etc.

Wrap Up James McVeigh, Festivals Edinburgh

I’m just going to do a few round ups. You’ve heard a lot today. We’ve got exhibitors who are right on your doorstep. We are trying to show you that digital is all around you, it’s right on your doorstep. I got a lot from this myself… I like that the zoo borrowed the ideas – we don’t always need to reinvent the wheel! The success of the Japanese economy is about adopting, not inventing.

Everything we have heard today is about UX, how audiences, share, engage, how they respond afterwards.

And as we finish I’d like to thank ETAG, to Digital Tourism Scotland, to Scottish Enterprise, and to the wider tourism industry in Edinburgh.

And finally, the next events are:

  • 29th November – Listening to our Visitors
  • 6th December – Running Social Media Campaigns
  • 26th January – ETAG Annual Conference

And with that we just have lunch, networking and demos of Bubbal and Hydra Research. Thanks to all from me for a really interesting event – lots of interesting insights into how tech is being used in Edinburgh tourism and where some of the most interesting potential is at the moment. 

Mar 132016
 

This afternoon I’m at the EdinburghApps Final Pitch event, being held at the University of Edinburgh Informatics Forum. As usual for my liveblogs, all comments and edits are very much welcomed. 

EdinburghApps, is a programme of events organised by Edinburgh City Council (with various partners) to generate ideas and technology projects addressing key social challenges. This year’s Edinburgh Apps event has been themed around health and social care (which have recently been brought together in Scotland under the Public Bodies Joint Working Bill for Health and Social Care Integration).

The event has run across several weeks, starting with an Inception weekend (on 6th & 7th Feb, which I blogged some of here), then a midway catch up/progress day (held on 27th Feb – you may have seen me tweet from this), and culminating in today’s final pitch event, at which we’ll hear from previous winners, as well as this year’s teams. The challenges they have been addressing around health and social care challenges fall under five headings (click to see a poster outlining the challenge):

Sally Kerr, Edinburgh City Council

Welcome to our final pitch event!

EdinburghApps is designed by the Council to explore how new approaches and new ideas can inform what we do. So, to start with, we are going to hear from some of our previous winners.

ARC-Edinburgh – Anne Marie Mann & Ella Robbins

Anne-Marie: We started this app to address Addiction recovery back at Edinburgh Apps in October 2014 – which we won!

So our app – a smartphone app just called ARC  (http://www.arcapp.co.uk) – is  an App to support those in Addition recovery, helping them to track progress, boost motivation, and connect to the Recovery Network in Edinburgh.

Key features of our app are a guide to local meetings, AA, NA, etc. We also have a motivation and reflection section which includes motivational quotes, mindfulness resources, and we also have a “Need Help?” section which connects the individual to our Emergency section. In this section we connect the user to their key contacts, they select these at set up and can send a pre-populated text asking for support.

But there is more here. We had an idea, now we have an app, a company, a community… And Robin is going to talk more about that.

Ella: I don’t think when we first had our idea we knew what would happen next. We worked with Jana at the City Council to create a proposal for a developer – we aren’t developers we just had an idea. We hired a developer – through Anne Marie – and he’s been the third part of this project the whole way through, and that’s Dave Morrison, University of St Andrews.

When we had the team we researched the market. We had access to a close friend with addiction issues who was able to give us an insight into needs and requirements. But we looked at what else was out there. We connected to Dave Williams at the council who connected us to Serenity Cafe, which helps addicts in recovery.

We then set up our company, which we run outside our full time work and care responsibilities. We then went into an intenside user requirements and design process – drawing out every screen of our app before anything was built. We created a project plan, we worked out a marketing plan, and we set about launching our app.

The Council’s role was funding – which was great – but also project management. We had regular meetings to check in and check progress. The council were also essential to that relationship to Serenity Cafe, and that local and specific expertise of Dave Williams. Those contacts, access to market research, and knowledge and experience helped us hugely, particularly to overcome challenges as we went along. The Council provided guidance. On a practical level the Council also undertook printing and distribution of marketing materials and crucial advocacy.

In terms of our reflections on this process… It has been hard work and took longer than we thought. I work in marketing in my day job so this was a huge change and learning opportunity for use. We’ve had to manage a whole range of stakeholders who we wouldn’t normally have worked with, managing expectations, undertaking user requirements, etc. was a huge opportunity. It was a real chance to help people of Edinburgh and has been enormously rewarding.

So, the app is out now and we’ll be giving it a big proper launch very soon!

Q&A

Q1) Can you see yourself doing another app now that you’ve done this?

A1 – Anne Marie) Ella just had a promotion at work, I’m just finishing my PhD, so not right now but I can see us doing more in the future.

A1 – Ella) Absolutely, sometime in the future, but not right now.

Run the City – Jenny Tough

This came out of Edinburgh Apps 2015, our team was Kate, Jenny and Hilde (aka Small, Medium and Tall). We all lived in different cities and had travelled to other places a lot so had lots of ideas about what we might do – probably 8 ideas, a bunch we pitched, but the one we settled on was Run the City…

So the idea was that running can be a brilliant way to explore a new city and get to know it, and as a traveller it would be great to have some guidance on the best routes etc. So, we proposed a mobile app that would be engaging, and have a minimum of 5 routes through the city, and would interoperate with other running apps – so you can capture all your running stats as you normally would. It was going to need to work on iOS and Android, and be easy to add these routes to.

So, myself and Jamie Sutherland (@Wedgybo) eventually took things forward – both of us are seasoned international runners.

We did some scoping on what runners would want and they really wanted a mixture of green routes and city routes, to not just be the key tourist areas. And that there needed to be different distances and difficulties, as well as th ebest local spots to run. I started out dropping key pins on the map based on Council data. But we also tried lots of routes out – running those routes, testing them out, making sure that worked.

The kind of data we were using was data on monuments in Parks and greenspaces. There were also trees with stories, parks in the city (with opening hours etc) and we came up with five routes…

The first of these routes is the City Centre Highlights and History, which starts on Calton Hill but also takes in Grassmarket etc. The second route is Edinburgh Green Route – for those wanting to enjoy great places to run but not neccassarily interested in the history. The third is around Hermiston Gait, which is actually beautiful. The fourth is the Water of Leith – and we had audio we could draw on here which was brilliant. And finally we had the Seven Hills of Edinburgh – a really difficult route but essential as an unofficial race does this route every year.

Jamie used Ionic framework which is based on AngularJS and ues Cordova for hybrid app. And we used FireBase to create the routes – and that looks really simple for me editing routes in the app.

We rang weekly test runs – in place of meetings! Edinburgh Apps gets you fit!

We sent the app to beta testers as it was, without instructions for accurate results. And there was mixed feedback on the runs and on the technical side of the app too.

In terms of what we found were difficult, and what we learned. We found audio placement difficult to define for different paces (i.e. walkers vs very fast runners) – and that only worked by testing it at those paces. The catchment area of audio points was also extremely hard to fine tune (e.g. which side of the road). But there was also the issue of the seasonability of Edinburgh – daylight time being an aspect, but also things like differences in route for festivals etc since footfall changes a lot. We also found that app simulator really didn’t give us a good idea of what worked and what didn’t – th eonly way to do that was test it with running.

The future for run the city. The MVP was recently launched and is available in the App Store right now. We have route development in siz new international cities currently underway. But doing more here is really a challenge when fitting this around other day jobs and responsibilities. So we are also testing monetisation strategies – events, in-app purchases, advertising to make that development work possible.

So, do try the app, give us your feedback.

Q&A

Q1) What is the audio?

A1) It’s the directions – turn left, turn right, etc. But also the things you are seeing and experiencing.

Q2) And how easily could that be changed? Is the audio geocoded? Have you considered iBeacons if they become more popular/available?

A2) The audio is tied to pins on the map added in FireBase. We have been considering iBeacons certainly.

Q3) Could you crowdsource the routes?

A3) Sure, but it can take a lot of work to develop the routes. But the running community online is big and active so I definitely think that that’s the way forward.

Sally: And now we have the really exciting part of the day, the pitches from our teams! So, lets start with Game of Walks…

A Game of Walks (#agameofwalks) – Gary

The team for this project was Elena (@atribeofneli), Katie (@hiccuo42), Lorna (@LornaJa23511553), Mischa, Gary (@garycmartin), Mohammed.

The project we were walking on with Sustrans was to encourage children to walk more. The idea is that with a school groups we gamify the walk to school. And to also include some level of STEM, as well as art as they get to design some parts of the system. The second weekend was rather fun as we prototyped the system.

The idea is that children are in different team groups, collecting a particular animal shape. Then they get to choose the animal shape for the next week’s challenge. The idea is that you place these devices across the walk to school you encourage walking to school, use of safe walking routes, and some gameplay.

So we are using Arduino with sensors… And walking part triggers the light. The units wait a set period, then select randomly but equally a shape to show (of three). And then triggering will show another shape. Each animal shows around 10 minutes – and you need to collect it. If it’s someone else’s shape then you don’t collect it. So other walkers, cats, dogs etc. may trigger the system but it should be random and unbiased. And when they capture that shape maybe they share it on their blog, league tables within the school etc. And the units use little gobo selectors so you can theme and change those as you want (e.g. easter, christmas, halloween), etc.

So the units are all 3D pieces (18-20 hours per unit and all the pieces). They aren’t quite ready for outdoors yet, but the battery life isn’t bad – 35-45 hours right now but could easily be set up to do a week. And you could also set up the units to only capture/be active during school run hours.

So, where we are now is that we want to do some school events – fairs or festivals or similar – to test them in a contained environment. But I’d be keen for feedback from teachers, teaching assistants, etc. who would be keen to use these with kids in a real environment.

Q&A

Q1) You said they aren’t waterproof at the moment?

A1) Not at the moment… You could take these and insulate the electronics on the inside so that they don’t corrode. If you wanted them more long term you could do more. The idea is to make these cheap and accessible – it’s about £12 in 3D printing material, and about £10 electronics, so relatively cheap and therefore not a big deal if they go missing. But actually you could fit most of the electronics in a poster boards – on a single image on the paper with a wireframe in that poster – which would be lovely. So, the form factor (units) isn’t essential.

Lots you could do here, like installing units that capture footfall data when game isn’t in place so that you have a baseline of data to give you some idea of how busy it is on a given route, and if the Game of Walks is making a difference.

Sally: We did test these units with colleagues at the council… And discovered just how competitive our adult colleagues were!

Meet & Eat: A recipe for Friendship – Beata and Annabella

Beata: The idea is basically dinner for strangers! Our mission statement was to help prevent loneliness amongst Edinburgh’s student population. The challenge owner was the NHS who highlighted the issue of loneliness, and that that is often about transitions in life of all sorts, including moving away from home/becoming a student. And this is a big problem. 68% of adults say that they feel alone, either often, sometimes or always. And 18-34 age group is most affected. Lack of personal contact can be as harmful to health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. So we really wanted to find a way to help.

Annabella: We thought that a great way to address this would be through food – as we all need to eat. So, our example Meet and Eat user is Jin. Jin is a 20 year old engineering student at Heriot Watt. Studies are fine, but he misses his family and friends from home. He sometimes finds it hard to make friends outside of class – initially language was an issue but it isn’t now… But he doesn’t have that network of friends and support. But Jin walks through university and sees a poster on the wall for Meet and Eat. He signs up and decides to join a dinner at his student union. He feels safe going to an event there and decides, being Japanese, he’s going to take sushi as his dish for the dinner. He meets new friends with things in common, and they can take it from there.

So, that’s the idea basically. Students are often early adopters of tech but we wanted to have a location for events that was safe and neutral – and accommodating of students who don’t have room for, say 5 people.

So, we tried to run two test events. The first was to be at Glasgow School of Art but that was in reading week. We ran another in Fountainbridge. We only had one student along but he gave us great feedback. He said first years are much much more open to this. Freshers week is when people are open to meeting people, starting events there would make people more likely to come. And we need better advertising.

Moving forward we would like to popularise the concept using existing social media, university intranet and forum platforms. We’d like to create a welcome pack for partnering with universities and include that in freshers week. And maybe that could lead to student Meet & Eat societies. If we get that buy in we think we could go forward with the app idea, but we need more market research and marketing support.

What we need is marketing assistance, links to universities – we have links with GSA and Napier. But we also need business advice, and we’d like more people for our team. We have work, university… a cat… But not sure how best to fit this in – although we’ve been inspired by the presentations that we’ve already seen.

Q&A

Q1) At least some students in first year of Edinburgh have catered food, not as likely to be able to participate.

A1 – Annabella) That’s a good point, which we hadn’t considered.

Q2) The office for social responsibility and sustainability in Edinburgh sponsored Global Sustainability Jam which led to an app called Fridge Friend – aimed at reducing waste by sharing with others.

A2 – Annabella) When we did some market research we also looked at supermarkets who recycle or discount food. We thought offers etc. might be encouraging and motivating.

Q2) There is also a thing called Food Share in Edinburgh who you might want to look at.

A2 – Beata) We looked at that but we think we need people engaged before we can do some of those partnership. In our research we came across Freedom who also use food waste in their cooking.

Q3) How do people get in touch if interested?

A3 – Annabella) We have meetandeatscotland@gmail.com

A3 – Beata) And a Facebook group as well.

Chattercare – Archie and his Dad 

This was initially designed to address people with cognitive issues… We are all social hubs, connecting with friends and families and neighbours… But when people have cognitive disadvantages they lose connections, those bonds are broken… People lose touch..

So, our idea is to enable communication between different people. So, the person with cognitive disadvantages can connect, but those people can also connect and exchange information between each other. We were really thinking about informal communication. From my perspective, when my great aunt had a stroke, you find yourself looking after someone with no idea of where to start… How do you wash a person in a wheelchair? What’s the new medication and possible side effects – how do I share that with others involved in care? For my great aunt she kept saying “miss miss” and had no idea what that meant – but actually she was wishing people a “Merry Christmas”.

So, how do you share that information? There are interest groups across similar carers; there are people caring for an individual – often many people involved; and messaging for one to one engagement; and we wanted some adaptive technology enabling the individual with cognitive difficulties to take part to. And so, that’s our idea.

And now… A live demo…

We are using a platform called Rocket Chat (Note: this looks like/may be a close relative to Slack) which is available for PCs, Macs, Web browsers, Tablets, Mobiles (iOS and Android). But we require lots of modifications… We will just show some examples here…

Lets call our home help “Jane Austen”. So Jane subscribed to a general #wheelchairusers channel, but she also is part of a homehelps private chat group for more specific questions.

“Mary Shelley” is our supervisor for home helps… And she subscribes to #wheelchairusers as well as #strokerecovery. But she is also part of direct message conversations with “Barbara Cartland” – the daughter of a patient who is interested in pensions. And also a private group for “Jack Faust” – an individual who needs care and help, this would be private to those caring for him. So Barbara Cartland asks for an update and his grandson “Billy Boy” sends an update and image from his visit.

So, what is ChatterCare since there is an application already there? Well it would be about customisation, and the idea would be that all communications are in one place; there is an opportunity for some oversight – so for instance the Stroke Recovery group could be monitored by the Council, to share authoritative information, expel myths, share resources known to be good. And eventually we’d really want some adaptive tech. It would be great to have the individual with cognitive difficulties directly involved, but they will all have very different needs and requirements, which is why that would be a later thing requiring further development.

Note: no questions here, so onto our final team… 

Open Doors – Laura & Team Open Doors

Loneliness is a huge issue in the UK and it needs to be dealt with soon. Over 1.7 million people over 65 can go a week without having contact with someone they know, of these 1.1 million can go a month without that sort of contact. So, our idea is an app called OpenDoors which will be simple and intuitive and is designed for older people.

Elderly people are quite keen to use new technology, but modern technology can have too many confusing functions and applications that they will never need. So, for this app we plan to use very large icons, make it visual and intuitive, add only the necessary functions and features. And we want it to be very consistent so the users always know what they are doing.

We talked to people who tried to do this before and we think the biggest challenge would be getting people to join this sort of social network. There are now 11 million people in the UK over 65 (AgeUK 2016) but only 28% using social media. So, we want to start with Elderly people in Edinburgh, working with family members as elderley people are more likely to use technology if a family member uses it and introduces it. We also plan to promote our service and network at offline events, including those run by the council. And we plan to have a listing of local events to encourage meeting and engagement. We will also look at TV ads, as TV is used by older people to manage loneliness.

We think this idea also has the potential to save the NHS money, since loneliness can have such detrimental mental and physical health effects.

Our initial idea was that we would create a simple button-like device to access Open Doors but, for safety reasons, we decided a standard tablet or mobile app would be more productive. The users of our app will be both the elderly individuals and anyone who is familiar with the mainstream mobile devices.

We haven’t tested the app yet but we have interviewed elderly people, researchers, and UX experts to get their input. We also have an event coming up at the end of the month. And we have designed the prototype app, to include clear easy to use functions, chat, etc. But to make our idea a reality we would need to develop our OpenDoors app to also work offline, so that it is more flexible.

Rahma: The app is very simple, big clear icons, and you can look at family members, view our friends very easily, make a call, or view chat. And, for the keyboard we have bigger icons/keyboard so it’s easier to type. Personal profiles let you add information. But this is a prototype…. We want to make it a real app that could be sold or available for free. So, for now we will develop the app and

Q&A

Q1) I would imagine that for your audience typing could be a challenge so autocomplete could be useful. Have you thought about customising that autocomplete/autocorrect for your users? My phone has autocorrect and autocomplete options… But those are biased to the model of what they think the user will say – so Californian tech comes up high in the options list. For your target population could you create a more appropriate model?

A1 – Laura) That would be possible. We were thinking of having voice commands for those with visual impairments. We haven’t considered what you were saying exactly, but it’s a really good piece of advice.

Q1) There is a team at Cambridge who helped Steven Hawking with this.

Q2) Most of us use a whole variety of tools right now… There is quite a wide list of tools in use in our family circle. If we all had to use one tool, we probably wouldn’t do that, but if that could stitch together existing tools that might work…

A2 – Laura) That’s what we want to do, to connect up some key tools but make it easier to engage with and use, making it more simple to use.

Q3) Great presentation. I have a comment about your user base… How will you develop your user base here? You need to think about how you get those early adopters first, to build up that interest to get to first 100 or 1000 users. Relying on Facebook or Twitter to find those family members won’t work.

A3 – Laura) Our marketing strategy is, for early adopters, to engage with the city, with the Council, and find users there. For app development and testing, and hopefully then expand out from there. Perhaps starting with computing clubs etc.

Sally: We have sadly reached the end of Edinburgh Apps and all the pitches will be on YouTube, and with the Council and Challenge Setters. My next step is to connect you to the right service owners, to help with next steps etc.

I want to thank all of the teams who took part. I know how much work it takes to get to this stage. I want to thank you personally for that work. And I also want to thank everyone who came along to support, to listen, etc. And, what we have for all the teams are some goodie bags. And I’d like all of the teams to come up here for huge round of applause!

Thank you again to you all! And do keep an eye online for all the videos!

And with that (and much rustling of goodie bags) we are done… ! 

Feb 252015
 
Duncan Shingleton from Design Informatics presents their projects at the University of Edinburgh GeoLocation in Learning and Teaching event.

This afternoon I am attending, and supporting my colleague Tom, at the GeoLocation in Learning and Teaching event at the University of Edinburgh. This is an internal event arranged by the Social and Cloud based Learning and Teaching Service. The event will be focusing on Geolocation technology used in learning and teaching at the University of Edinburgh.

We are kicking off with a brief introduction from Susie Greig to the day noting that “there does seem to be some interest in using GeoLocation in learning and teaching” – something definitely backed up by a very full room for this afternoon’s session!

Dr Hamish MacLeod, Senior Lecturer, Moray House School of Education– will be discussing the INGRESS game, he will describe the many rich features, and why he thinks they are (potentially) relevant to learning.

I think there are two real approaches to learning in gaming… One you might attribute to Marc Prensky – a kind of con folk into learning approach. I have much more sympathy for James Paul Gee‘s take on gaming and learning.

I am talking about INGRESS, a mobile game (iOS and Android) but it is not a casual game, it requires proper engagement. It is a location dependent game – you have to get out there and use it in the world and it demands movement in the world. It is also an “exergame” – perhaps encourages exercise. It is an augmented relaity game, and alternate reality game, and it is open to users – you can contribute, interact, actively contribute to the game.

The game itself uses Google Maps as a basis, and the deceit of the game is that bright sparkly “portals” bring exotic matter to the world… and that exotic matter powers our scanner, our mobile phone… The object is to capture these portals and explore them. There are two factions in the game: green is the enlightened; the blue is the resistance…

The Enlightened is a faction attempting to help aliens called “Shifters” in the world. The Resistance are opposed to the Shifters presence in the world. Immediately shades of post modern theory…

Looking at a player profile you see a name, you see badges for achievements… and Google sits behind all of this… You can link your playing identity to your G+ profile (I haven’t).

The game is planet-wide – at least in terms of locations that are populated. My own neighbourhood is occupied by the enlightened faction… ! You can grab portals from your desk but the object is really to go further out, to explore the world…

The portals are not placed consistently, they tend to be associated with human objects… When you are proximal to a portal you can do various things… You can “hack” the portal to deploy objects useful in the game. You can deploy resonator or recharge it… Portals decay over time… You can also choose to attack portals… All of these portals have a physical existance… When one captures a portal, one finds out about the places one is moving around in… The information about the object the portal is focused on can be edited and added to… additional views can be included… If I really wanted some exercise, I would go up to Calton Hill… They will be less heavily defended because they are more remote than those in the city centre. Unclaimed portals are white… you use “resonators” to claim it… As a player I am level 6… that dictates what type/number of resonators I can deploy… I need other people to help me defend the portal… So there is a collaborative aspect whether you know who you are playing with or not…

There is a massive amount of media associated with the game: those announcing international events around the game; something that appears to be fan fiction, but managed by Google; and there is some back story about the game and the Shapers… Very rich media background to the game…

So, here, now… here is what one might do… Near here you will find a plaque to Clarinda, the name Burns used for Alice Macleroy who corresponded with him… There turns out to also be a plaque at the Carpet[I’ve misheard this] Tollbooth… Things you don’t know about the world around you…

From this game you can expose information, shapes to remember… puzzles and sequences to be echoed back to earn points… But these are not just arbitrary shapes, these are meaningful glyphs… Once we understand what they mean, they will read as meaningful or enigmatic sentences… A lovely illustration of George Meliores mystical number 7 in which we chunk information in order to process it better…

Here we see a (tweet) visualising a Christmas tree composed of links between portals… The two factions do compete in the game but this pattern is a massive act of collaboration and organisation to do this. There are halloween variants too… So the game is played at various levels, from casual to this sort of organised community…

We can add portals, and propose portals… It can take a while for portals to be vetted and recognised… I have managed to establish some… Including Hutton’s Rock on Salisbury Crags, and sites where core samples have been taken to find changes in the magnetic field over time… I’ve been systematic… and you could do that process, of creating portals.

You can also propose missions in the game – so there are missions around Scottish Enlightenment sites, The Royal Mile, Sir William Topaz McGonagall… So these user generated activities, projects… could be taken on to engage with resources in our environment that we wouldn’t usually engage with in that way…

Q&A

Q PW: This reminds me of Geo Caching, but this seems to have far more central control. Is that good or bad?

A HM: It is controlled by Google, of course it is providing them with many points of interest. Offers of suggestions can be slow to do… Geo Caching can be more controllable activity for a group of students to use though…

Q SG: Are you thinking of using this on your programme?

A HM: We are thinking about the Games Based Learning module… We use World of Warcraft there… But we look at designs of games for learning so it is interesting in that contact. But our degree is online and interestingly INGRESS really relates to shared geographical space – WoW is better in a lot of ways.. But you could work on the pattern making aspects.

Comment FH: It could be about time rather than location perhaps…

A HM: To play with this in a geographically co-located group would be interesting, might be other uses entirely for a distributed group of learners

Q TF: If I want students to learn about, say, medical education could I map it onto this game – or another – or does the game need to change?

A HM: You could have a walking tour of Edinburgh highlighting medical locations, historical dimensions and people associated with that… It might be forced or less forced depending on what you want to achieve

Comment COS: It might be fun for orientation sessions for colocated students.

Tom Armitage, Geoservices Support, EDINA –  will present on the mobile mapping and data collection app Fieldtrip GB.

I’m talking about FieldTrip GB, but firstly I just wanted to tell you a bit about what we do at EDINA. We are a Jisc Supported National Datacentre providing services, data, support, etc. Our work covers geospatial services, reference, multimedia, access areas and tools including FieldTrip GB. Digimap is our main geospatial service, we run GoGeo that allows you to search for geospatial data and create and share your own metadata records via GeoDoc – ideal for sharing geospatial research data. We have Unlock which lets you create geospatial search tools, or to georeference your own text. We also have OpenStream which allows you to stream open data from Ordnance Survey into websites/GIS. Finally FieldTrip GB which lets you gather data in the field.

We also have projects: AddressingHistory georeferenced historical Post Office Directories; we are involved in Trading Consequences and Palimpsest projects, both about geoparsing documents and visualising that; Spatial Memories was a project to help visually impaired learners to navigate the world through a mobile app; and finally the COBWEB project which is a large FP7-funded project with many aspects that link into data collection and citizen science.   

So, FieldTrip GB was about bringing some key fields to mobile. To be able to capture images, audio, text, location. To be able to use high quality background maps, and to be able to save maps for use “offline”. It allows you to do custom data collection forms, and to then access that form and collect data via your phone or tablet – it is available for Apple iOS devices or Android devices.

The main screen of the app lets you view online or saved maps, to capture data – both forms and GPS tracking. And the Download button lets you download mapping for use online. Login is via Dropbox… We chose Dropbox because it is free, the terms of use don’t give Dropbox access to users data – preferable to other services. And that also means the data is the property and responsibility of the user. And you can also potentially share Dropbox details to enable crowd sourcing…

So, the powerful bit of FieldTrip GB is the authoring tool… You can drag and drop different types of data capture into a form – text fields, multiple choice questions, ranges to select from, drop down menus, image capture, etc… You can drag and drop these items in, you can label and set limits/labels/choices as you wish. As soon as that is saved, it can be accessed from the app on your phone/tablet… And anyone with that Dropbox login can go in and use that form and submit data…

Those custom forms allow for easy data  management – consistent terms, single data structure, setting increments to aid estimates, reduced errors (or consistent at least!). Once you fill in a form, you click save.. and then you get to locate your data. Shown as a point on the map based on where you are standing. You can move that pin as needed, you can manually correct where the form things you are…

A wee bit about the mapping… We have combined OS OpenData, added contour mapping from other open sets of maps, brought in Open Street Maps, so we have a custom stack of high quality mapping for the UK, built on all open data sources… We have two different maps at the same scale – one is better in urban areas, one better for rural areas, so you see the appropriate mapping in the area you are in (may combine these in light of new data available openly from the Ordnance Survey).

The advantage of offline mapping is that it saves on cost in urban areas, and allows access in rural areas where there may not be internet access of any type. And everything cached loads faster too!

So, you go out, you collect data… You then can go back to the authoring tool to view data, to filter it, browse the data, edit or delete records if you need to, by uploader (if you include that in your form), to download/export it as kml, GeoJson, csv, wms. You can also share maps through Dropbox. GeoJson is good for embedding maps into websites. KML opens up in Google Earth – looks beautiful!

We’ve put together a vague practical lesson plan that you could use with a class… You set up a Dropbox account that you are happy to share. You download FTGB, you design your form, you share the form – and encourage downloading of maps, in the field you then collect the data using the form, you get back you get online and upload your forms/results, you go into the authoring tool and filter as needed (e.g. incomplete forms), then you can export your data and view them in your choice of whatever tools.

In the future release we will be releasing a global edition, based on OpenStreetMap. It will work the same way but with different background mapping. We may also be supporting upload of your own maps to use as a basemap when you are out collecting data. Similarly points of interest/waymarkers. Also extra sensor measurements – phone as a compass for instance, maybe also ambient noise via microphones. Potentially also more complex forms… we have had requests for logic to change later questions based on a form… All to come in future versions!

Q&A

Q: Some of those extra features – your own maps, waymarkers, OSM – would be really useful.

A TA: Would be great to hear that from your as evidence for those developments.

Q: You talked about Dropbox, have you considered OneDrive which the university now has access to.

A TA: Yes, we built it to feed into any cloud storage provider… We started with Dropbox and have stuck with because it is most flexible

Comment NO: We are using FTGB in COBWEB, so we are self hosting rather than using Dropbox, also using access management.

Q JS: Can you embed images in the app for users to use to identify what they are seeing? e.g. an image of a tree.

A TA: YEs, also looked at in COBWEB, also dichotomous trees… Will all come, probably as part of the COBWEB development.

Dr. Anouk Lang, Lecturer in Digital Humanities, School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures will discuss how she uses the SIMILE Exhibit platform, which runs off the Google Maps API, to create an interactive map to use with students to explore the literary culture of Paris in the 1920s.

I’ll be showing you a site I have built (see: http://aelang.net/projects/) using SIMILE Exhibit, using Google Maps Engine. This is a map of Paris with information related to literature in Paris. Paris was a particularly important place for anglophone modernism – lots of Americans moves there – Stein, Joyce, Fitzgerald, and that decade was so important to modernism. The histories of this time are concerned with a linear narrative. When we see a map it is very seductive… But that is a representation, not accurate. But I was particularly keen to map those places that matter… It can be hard to understand the role of spatiality of the places in this movement (or indeed in general).

So, in this tool you can explore by person… So you can for instance view Sylvia Beach‘s life, a book seller central to modernism in Paris. Clicking on a place gives you more information about that place, it’s relevance.

So, how do you build this? You have a script that is free to use. You enter data into a Google Spreadsheet… There are some predefined fields here… I put in bibliographic reference to allow me to use it in teaching. I put in a person as I am interested in the social links within modernism. The reason I like this is taht in the humanities is that we aren’t really trained to use GIS, but a spreadsheet we can just about manage!

So the data is piped in from a Google spreadsheet, but you have to build the front end. I found a guide from Brian Croxall (see also this code on GitHub) will walk you through the process – you can use his JavaScript and tinker with it…. So you get it up and running…

I originally built this for teaching. The 1920s wasn’t recognised as important until much later on 1950s/60s/70s. By then it is clear, in the biographies, who the big important players are. And those who never quite published that master work etc, insert themselves into that history. For instance we have Canadian writers (e.g. Morley Hallaghan, the only person to knock out Ernest Hemingway) who have interesting interactions with the big players. John Glassco’s Memoirs of Montparnasse, documents his bisexual adventures with both male and female writers of this tine… He locates himself close to key locations… But he has a rival, Morley Hallaghn… So he mentions meeting him but never assigns the location/space there… It sheds a whole new life in their relationships that would have been invisible if I’d looked at those works in any other way… mapping their locations was so useful.

Now I built this for research, but it does double duty for teaching. It is a framework for research, but I got students to think about sociality of modernism in Paris. I asked them to find one piece of information relevant to modernism, arts, culture in Paris, and to find the Geolocation associated with that person – the details are often vague in biographies and texts. That task took them a long time… Then the students were given access to the spreadsheet… So you can then see those entries, and visualise them on that map… And we were able to see patterning of which writers stayed where. So you can explore the locations of women versus those of men. So Paris in the 20s had a group of unusually strong women, publishing each others work… so where did they hang out? That concept is in play… That cotillion sense of our everyday place actually shaped literary history. Place is such an interesting lens through which to consider this work. We may only have sparse information of where these people live and stay – and we may have location only for months or a few years… raises useful questions, lets us ask critical things… Mapping this stuff perhaps helps you see biases, particularly around the prominence of particular places versus others.

So, students begin to understand the research process… you have contingent data that you need to make an argument out of.

Something I love about the Digital Humanities is the sense and culture of openness… And when you teach there is a commitment among the best teachers in this subject to share the very best students work online. That makes students very aware of this very public process – they are very serious about, it is their reputation on the line/building up, and a thing to point employers and peers, etc. to in the future…

So, we build this stuff… We need to embed it so students have to learn a snippit of HTML. Students also learn the importance of precision. If students use “1920’s” rather than “1920s” will hide their work in the faceted search. It seems like a tiny thing but in this subject changes in punctuation can be so important – whether in student work or in those writing on Emily Dickenson’s work.

The other thing that this was helpful for was bibliographic referencing… They were expected to get a proper reference… As we clicked in things in class I mentioned errors… As I did that students were editing their own references live in response. The publicness of the sharing made them keen to correct things! I also really like the serendipity of this – and other new tools – in teaching.

I should say that you can’t do spatial analysis in this. But the SIMILE Exhibit tools do let you view a timeline (and click for more data). But the map is  a point map, I would pull the data out and put it into Arc GIS to do serious spatial analysis on this data… So looking for the shapes, comparing literary to tourist areas for instance.

So, if you want to play, I have a sand box. Find it at: http://aelang.net/projects/canada.htm, just email me for access. If you do edit, do include an identifier to ensure you can identify your own entries – and view just those points on the map.

Q&A

Q: Will you put in iTunes?

A Anouk: Will I make it an app? No. Firstly Google Maps Engine has been depreciated by Google so it’s going, so I need to move to OSM. But also an app is not what I need for my students.

Duncan Shingleton, Research Assistant/Technician, School of Design will presentation on various location based research projects Design Informatics has done…

Oxfam: Sixth Sense Transport

Project under Sixth Sense Transport project, mapping people’s transport habits and seeing if we could help the efficiency of drops to Oxfam clothing banks, minimising car journeys. And to maximise the efficiency of volunteer drivers visiting donation bank sites where the fill level is below that which justifies the journey in terms of goods recovered vs time and carbon output.

We partnered with SmartBin to put infrared (IR) sensors on the bin to measure the fill rate of the bin in real time… Looking at patterns of deposit and emptying of bins we can direct the Oxfam drivers to pick up before other (theft) emptying occurs… So, we have a simple app that shows bin sites, shop sites, and where drivers are. Phones with the app went to shop managers and drivers. Tracking fill levels, (volunteer) drivers indicate stock levels.. It allows Oxfam to track high value items, or items that sell better in particular locations can be taken to the right places for sale.

We have also done predictive analysis of whether driver will be on a particular day of a week… likely places to collect from… and that helps managers suggest ad hoc pick ups – e.g. house clearances. And if a bin has been broken into that can be recorded… messaging can happen between drivers. Lots of new communication happen, there was less driving/CO2 impact, and better success with bins…

Walking Though time – negotiating the streets of Edinburgh in 1860

On the app store so you can download the Walking Through Time iOS app… We are all fascinated by maps and exploring the city… We found that visitors and tourists are looking to Edinburgh’s past. So how could you give people the experience of walking through Edinburgh in the past? It’s a simple map that uses historical maps of Edinburgh, from EDINA, and overlay that on your current Google Maps… So you can walk Edinburgh in 1807… And alongside that you can create story trails that people can add to – story trails, places of interest… And view points of interest for people to click on and learn about key buildings and sites.

Comob – Networking people movements

Comob is about networking people, or people’s movements in maps… You can see your own blue dot on the map, but what about other people? So it’s a very simple idea… It clocks you, and everyone else, drawing a boundary around all of you – kettling you in a sense… So you can login to the map, connecting to loads of people in the world… We don’t know why people are using this in the US and in Singapore. We found truckers using it along the Mexican border! If you go to a new place… I went to Manchester, Chris was there too… So we both opened up Comob, it drew a line between us, and I could just follow the line to him! And you can also use Comob to draw portraits of, e.g. audible noise pollution. Can be used by police for kettling crowds – we tried this, it didn’t launch but we tried it…

And families use it… A family in New Zealand use it, a mum can see her sons – one a pilot, one a roadside repair vehicle, to see where they all are in space and time. IT’s a connection, that feeling of comfort and knowing in the network… So she can imagine her sons day in comparison to her… She has an emotional connection with him…

CoGet – Objects hitch hiking on the path of humans

On a similar note we wanted to see what it would be like to map things… And the relationship between things in a network.. When I go to work each morning it’s the same people at the bus stop, on the train commute… It doesn’t vary a lot… So as the system gets to know everyone’s movements can you get an object from one side of the city to another? In CoGet you can work out your position in space, and direction… And where you may be in the future based on that and your speed… And then if you visualise everyone elses position in the network, and their trajectories… You can visualise that too… So if you have an object to move, you can use the app to move that thing, using the app to alert you on who to pass your object to! So, no extra journey, no extra carbon… As you walk you don’t look for opportunities to interact… everyone is stranger… So it is strange when your phone buzzes, and the other person buzzes, and you have that moment of social interaction… You then move around looking for opportunities. A good fun social experiment to take part in!

Mr Seels Garden – Food narratives in the city (mrseelsgarden.org)

Memories of Mr Seels Garden was a project on the food history of Liverpool, inspired by a former vegetable garden. It started very simply as a memory pool of significant places in the food histories. That’s fine spatially… but how might you carry those food histories with objects. You have barcodes, QR codes and RFID tags in retail… So we designed an app that you can use (only in Liverpool) with city and site clouds – you could explore the whole city, or just the area/geolocation of a specific site… As you move nearer a point of interest a story can change about the thing you are carrying… And you could also see stories across multiple products – a tin of tomato, a pineapple, etc…  Some sites have stories for multiple products, some products have multiple sites associated…

That’s enabled by geo-fencing… which brings us to…

Ghost Cinema – cinematic narratives in battersea

As you walk around Battersea, this app will nudge you to alert you about film sites/filming locations, former cinemas etc. Another small site-based geofencing experience… Find out more on the Cinematic Battersea website.

Treasure Trapper – Mobile game in conjunction with Edinburgh Museum and Galleries.

Edinburgh Museums and Galleries have nine sites… But when anyone visits the city they want to go to the Castle, and maybe the NMS… But how do they attract visitors into their group of museums and galleries? So we looked at the bus network, particularly noted that many of their sites are on the tourist bus network. So we wondered if we could use that network to promote their museums and galleries…

Again we thought about unique identifiers, barcodes, QR codes, RFID codes, and number plates… Treasure Trapper works with the city’s bus network: as buses move around the city they automatically gather items on their route… And, a bit like Pokémon, you can chase buses down to grab that object… But you can only drop items off at the museum!

So, again, a very simple iphone app… museums can add items into the system… The app tells you when a bus arriving… once there you can grab it, and return it to the museum where you are rewarded with a free badge or discount code, etc.

Q&A

Q PW: I was particularly taken with the CoGet idea… You showed straight lines and vectors… does it understand streets/paths etc?

A: Only in the sense that it measures every 15 seconds, and learns paths… And will update accordingly

Q PW: Given that Google Maps etc. estimate times in.. have you looked at that?

A: Not so much as those require your destination. But it does work out time based on speed of transit for estimation of subsequent location.

Jonathan Silverton Chair in Technology Enhanced Science Education in the School of Biological Sciences – will present on “Virtual Edinburgh: turning the whole city into a mobile learning environment”

Virtual Edinburgh is actually an idea, in fact one that feels like it already has so much substance already based on the work here. The idea is to turn Edinburgh, the city, into a pervasive learning environment. So I’m basically talking about little more than linking all those apps and ideas together.

As a newcomer to Edinburgh I am struck by just how much there is to learn about the city – the history, the science – and if we can open that up to students to be a resource for them to explore, to be available to them… it becomes a learning city…

So we have apps that feed data to people – WTT, Palimpsest, MESH (Mapping Edinburgh’s Social History), iGeology 3D (developed by BGS)… Already there… feeding data out… But there are also other apps like FieldTrip GB that let you feed in data too – essential for students to be able to engage and contribute if we want students to take. And there’s something of my own here… iSpot which is about identifying organisms in a community of about 50,000. Location is recorded for everything there… And another one that allows you to contribute is the “nearby” function in Wikipedia… Editing Wikipedia exposes this…

And there’s another FIELDTrip, this one from Google, with less exciting information about pubs and cafes…

We are overwhelmed with geolocated data, we are particularly blessed here… With a city with so many hooks on which to build cool things for our students to do… So the idea is to take all the stuff already going on, and make the most of the synergies already going on…

So, a theoretical example…

Calton Hill to King’s Buildings journey… On iSpot 6 spottings of organisms there… Here others have confirmed that sighting (more than a Like on Facebook), with geolocation etc… So that use of the name of the object unlocks knowledge – they can look it up, they can see Wikipedia, Encyclopaedia of Life, etc. Click to explore…

At this point we could link it into Edinburgh research… So we look up that organism and find the Halliday Lab that researches that plant… (arabidopsis thaliana)… So there we are, can find out about what research is going on at Edinburgh that you spotted on Calton Hill… It’s nearly all linked up already… We could do it quickly if this was a hack..

So we have an idea of how this might all work… you have data sets, you have students and researchers creating the things… perhaps this material is also consumed by the local community… and it builds on what’s already going on…

As soon as you overlay different data sets there is an issue of how you give people intuitive access… So we are thinking about using tools like 3D visualisations, as already are in use in the Old College app… We need something intuitive here, as all drop down lists etc. won’t do this stuff…

So, we have a lot of use cases here, some are playful, some are more practical, some artistic… There are lots of different ways this idea can be used in teaching, in research, in art…  Edinburgh can be a city of learning, just as much as it is a city of literature and of heritage… Watch this space for more on the idea.

Q&A

Q MW: I love the vision of the idea, and I’d like the idea of allowing the community to contribute, and of mapping and tracking that, to see where contributions are coming from, understand what is coming in the near future, etc.

A JS: Yup, great idea.

Final Summing Up – Susie Greig

There has been some interest in Wikipedia Nearby. This is an option within Wikipedia to look at things from a geolocation point of view. It is part of the Wikipedia app. You can explore from phones/tablets or from your PC. There have been some interesting references made to Wikipedia Nearby, Wikipedia’s blog talks about this function also being used to trigger users to add images for those pages. We love the idea but me and my colleagues testing suggests that that isn’t quite working yet… Has anyone explored this yet? We just thought Wikipedia is editable, could set up scavenger hunts and trails… So we just wanted to mention that it’s there and if you can get that extra functionality to work, do share!

And finally, thank you to everyone for coming along today!

Aug 292013
 

Following my post earlier this month on the Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas event which myself and my colleagues Addy and Ben ran on Fieldtrip GB, I am delighted to have some additional follow up.

The main reason for this follow up is because Eccentronic have created a fantastic and, in their words, “quite bizarre”  video using the map of public toilets we created specially for our event using Fieldtrip GB. Watch it in all of it’s glory here:

YouTube Preview Image

Do let Eccentronic know what you think – comment or like the video over on YouTube, tweet them @eccentronic, or leave comments below.

Now, this is definitely the most creative response I’ve seen to Fieldtrip GB… so far! I’m hoping it’s the start of many weird and wonderful uses of the app! On that note do share your own thoughts on our key question from the event :

If you could map anything in your community, what would it be and why?

here, in the comments below.

And the other goodies to share…

The Edinburgh Beltane Network – who were coordinating the Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas events with Susan Morrison – have now set most of the images from the very varied Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas events live here on Flickr.

Addy Pope speaking to the small audience at the Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas

Addy Pope speaking at our Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas event.

This leaves only the audio file from our event. If it is sounds reasonable we will share it via an update to this post so bookmark this post and keep an eye out!

:: Update: The Audio from our Fringe show is now live. You can download or play it via this MP3. ::

 August 29, 2013  Posted by at 5:29 pm Week In the Life Tagged with: , , , , ,  No Responses »
Sep 022011
 

I am very aware that I haven’t posted an update here in a long while so I thought I’d provide a wee update on what I’ve been up to for the last month.

The Social Media & Repositories Round Table (you can see me chairing) at Repository Fringe 2011

The Social Media & Repositories Round Table (you can see me chairing) at Repository Fringe 2011

After a busy early summer of attending events August has seen me wearing my organiser hat. First up was Repository Fringe 2011, our annual unconference on all things repository which this year took place in Fringe Preview week in the Informatics building in George Square (or the Gilded Balloon/Assembley/BBC@Potterrow as the area is known in August). My role at Repository Fringe (this was my third) is to amplify the event and this year we went for a fairly successful blend of liveblogging, a very busy #rfringe11 hashtag, and a Flickr group for any attendee to submit images to.  We have also uploaded all the presentations that we can on SlideShare (these are also embedded on our new Presentations page) and are adding video recordings to our YouTube channel over the next few weeks.

This year we had a few new tools to try out for RepoFringe. We weren’t streaming video from our filming team this year but we decided it was worth trialling use of UStream for this purpose. It wasn’t ideal but it did allow those not attending in person to get a sense of what was going on particularly on the workshop day where we hadn’t planned to film presentations.  A definite learning experience although it seemed to be a compatibility glitch with our netbook that caused more issues than UStream itself.

I also experimented with the new(ish) EDINA Flip Camera to grab short highlights such as this live demo from Dave Tarrant of Southampton University showing off instant deposit via a Microsoft Kinect:

The Flip was great for capturing things quickly and easily, the qulaity is good and it’s super portable but a few things are frustrating: it has to be charged via USB which takes longer than the resultant battery time; you are limited to 90mins recording; it works best as a static camera but is very small so it is not wildly sturdy when on tripods.

Comob Net workshop at the JISC GECO Open Source Geo & Health Workshop

Just a few days after Repository Fringe – and using many of the same amplifying tools – came the first JISC GECO event on Open Source Geo & Health and hosted at Edinburgh Napier University’s Merchiston Campus. I was live-blogging once again and the event included a hard to capture but very fun to take part in Comob Net workshop led by Chris Speed and using the Comob Net app on a variety of iPhones and iPads to draw virtual shapes on the landscape.  It led to anarchic crowd control issues – what to do when one group walks off too far and fails to appear on schedule? – but was hugely engaging.

After a week off – more on that in a blog post to follow – we had a further GECO event booked, this one in partnership with DevCSI which is, as an aside, a wonderful programme of events and projects to encourage developers in academia to be creative, to network, to experiment and feel valued. The Open Mapping Workshop preceded the first ever OpenStreetMap State of the Map Scotland event and was about providing support and encouragement to those wanting to use open source mapping tools. Again we amplified the day (live blog post here) but as this event took place in quite a small room (the Electron Club at the Centre for Contemporary Art in Glasgow) there were a few issues with tripping over each other, finding a good place for the camera etc. Thankfully I’d taken along a Zoom recorder and the audio capture was a lot more successful than the videoing.

This week I’ve found myself involved in organising yet another event, this time it is part of Social Media Week Glasgow, a week long series of free events on all aspects of Social Media. If you haven’t already heard about this you should take a look at the website. If you are outside Scotland’s Central belt keep an eye on the website for streaming from events and those taking place in 11 other global cities between 19th and 23rd September.

The event I’m helping to organise is a joint event between EDINA and Edinburgh Beltane Beacon for Public Engagement focusing on social media in academia and particularly social media for public engagement. You can read more (and book a space) on our event page (some of the details on which will be confirmed shortly).

On a related note there are a few other Interesting Upcoming Social Media Events that I wanted to give a wee shout out to:

 

May 102011
 

This weekend my colleague Gavin and I decided it would be useful (and fun!) to head along to Culture Hack Scotland, a 24 hour hackday organised by the Edinburgh Festivals Innovation Lab and themed around both the festivals and the wider Scottish cultural scene.

The Edinburgh Festivals Innovation Lab is a new(ish) initiative which has emerged from Edinburgh Festivals, the organisation that is jointly funded by all 12 of the official Edinburgh Festivals to enable them to work together throughout the year, promote initiatives and festival content etc. The idea for the Innovation Lab apparently emerged out of discussions with all of the festivals about their use or interest in digital technology: there were lots of ideas and potential for projects but they didn’t necessarily have the time or skills to take these forward. Last year the Lab hired their inaugal geek-in-residence Ben Werdmuller (he of Elgg fame) and the Culture Hack Day was a significant outcome of the work he has been doing over the last few months. Continue reading »

Apr 012011
 

Today I will be liveblogging the eLearning@Ed 2011 conference which is taking place at the National eScience Centre at Edinburgh University today. The usual rules of liveblogging apply of course – posts will be updated through the day and there will be typos, errors, etc. that I will be correcting as I spot them or when I clean up this blog post at the end of the day.


Welcome by Tim O’Shea, Vice-Principal of UoE

This is the 8th eLearning @Ed conference. Emphasized that Informatics one of the top 5 depts in the world, a leader in ISG etc.  All 3 colleges and ISG are here represented today. We are a really huge university. We could have just had elearning in Moray House or the Vet School but a fundamental of the approach that Jeff Hayward and I have taken is to make sure there isn;t just one unit where all elearning is based but a community across the university. The university’s mission is to ensure we have valuable non trivial use of elearning across the university. We are doing something new here, we are creating new spaces for students to learn in. At events like this we can think about taking best advantage of the unique aspects of elearning.It is not about economics but about the student experience.

Continue reading »