Feb 032011
 

As many of you may already know I’ve been working with my colleagues to create a set of guidelines on blogging and social media for some time. I am therefore very excited to let you know that we have just published version 1.0 of the EDINA Social Media Guidelines on the EDINA website under a CC (Attribution-ShareAlike) license.

The guidelines are intended to encourage and support use of social media but also to provide some common sense advice about getting presences set up, dealing with difficult comments, etc.  We have been using various draft versions of the guidelines internally for some time in order to gather feedback on how well they work, what else should be covered, etc. and this has been an invaluable process. I think the guidelines that have emerged are much stronger for the community input we’ve had and this first full version feel really compact, really relevant and cover a lot of ground, or, as my colleague Paul puts it: the guidelines are “a short but meaty” document.

Obviously social media moves fast and to stay relevant these guidelines will continue to develop, iterating regularly to take account of new tools and technologies and to take account of the feedback we receive back. With that in mind I would love to hear your comments and feedback on this first version.

Publishing the guidelines means we are not only being transparent about our own processes of adopting and using social media but it also means we can learn from others’ experiences and feedback. We are also sharing what we have learned over a roughly two year process. When I began drafting the guidelines I reviewed other social media guidelines (for which Jeremiah Oywang’s blog is always a useful source) including those from IBM, the UK Government Twitter guidance (links to Guardian coverage as the original copy is no longer available), various local councils policies, the BBC guidelines and, curiously but very usefully, the US Air Force flow chart for dealing with comments (which has inspired our own comment moderation guide).

We’ve also used the guidelines as an opportunity to flag up some of our current social media activity. We already have a social media page on the EDINA website but we’ve also posted a news item today to highlight some of the recent activity on those blogs, twitter accounts, Facebook pages, etc. that we list. My colleagues at EDINA share their substantial expertise and experiences through project, service and team social media presences and I highly recommend taking a wee look around the blogs in particular.

I hope you’ll find the guidelines interesting and if you think they might be useful for your own organisation please do have a look, grab a copy and adapt as you’d like – though I’d love to hear how you’re using them – do leave me a comment or drop me an email!