Jun 062017
 

Today I am at the CILIPS Conference 2017: Strategies for Success. I’ll be talking about our Digital Footprint work and Digital Footprint MOOC (#DFMOOC). Meanwhile back in Edinburgh my colleagues Louise Connelly (PI for our Digital Footprint research) and Sian Bayne (PI for our Yik Yak research) are at the Principal’s Teaching Award Scheme Forum 2017 talking about our “A Live Pulse”: YikYak for understanding teaching, learning and assessment at Edinburgh research project. So, lots of exciting digital footprint stuff afoot!

I’ll be liveblogging the sessions I’m sitting in today here, as usual corrections, additions, etc. always welcome. You’ll see the programme below becoming 

We have opened with the efficient and productive CILIPS AGM. Now, a welcome from the CILIPS President, Liz McGettigan, reflecting on the last year for libraries in Scotland. She is also presenting the student awards to Adam Dombovari (in absentia) and Laura Anne MacNeil. She is also announcing the inauguration of a new CILIPS award Scotland’s Library and Information Professional of the Year Award – nomination information coming soon on the website – the first award will be given out at the Autumn Gathering.

Keynote One – The Road to Copyright Literacy: a journey towards library empowerment Dr. Jane Secker, Senior Lecturer in Educational Development at City, University of London and Chris Morrison, Copyright and Licensing Compliance Officer, University of Kent

Jane: We are going to take you on the road to copyright literacy… And we have on our tour shirts – these are Copyright exception shirts… They are a parody Guns and Roses tour shirts…

Now, we want to ask you: How does copyright make you feel? [cue some voting] Mostly confused…

Chris: When we’ve done this across the country people have said it made them warm and fuzzy, very happy, but also worried, anxious or confused and faintly cautious…

Jane: Now Copyright get Chris and I really excited… But what gets us even more excited… Star Wars! When they were working on the prequels to star wars, George Lucas’ advice to the young film makers was “Don’t be Afraid”…

Chris: Fear leads to a fight or flight. That’s not what you need… you need to work through it calmly and diligently…

Jane: So lets take this back a bit…

Chris: I was a musician, so I thought what job can I do around music… So I started working at PRS – who handle performing rights for music… Then moved onto the British Library working on copyright…  Music turns out to be less glamorous than I expected, libraries turned out to much more glamorous than I expected! My life changed, I moved to Kent and now work at University of Kent as Copyright Officer, and they are brilliant in supporting me to do things like this!

Jane: I went to Aberystwyth, worked with old newspapers – out of copyright so really it wasn’t my thing… I works at the National History Museum…. Then at the British Library… When I moved to UCL to work on digitising lecture materials and course materials copyright became my thing, researching this area… Then onto LSE, working with staff on training, working with academics around copyright literacy… And just recently I moved to University of London in a lectureship role, again educating people on Copyright.

Chris: Now, in 2014 we finally saw some reforms to Copyright Law following the Hargreaves Review…

Jane: When that review came out in 2011 I needed a speaker, someone mentioned Chris… And that was the beginning of a beautiful friendship really… A few years later I was at a conference in Dubrovnic and heard about a concept called “Copyright Literacy” and I wanted to run some research around that – 600 of you completed that, and actually research on copyright literacy took place across 14 countries..

Chris: Out of that work we started looking at resources, including designing Copyright: the board game (CC licensed) which helps you to work out

Jane: Chris and I are part of the Universities UK Copyright and licensing group. We also have a book out: Copyright and e-learning: a guide for practitioners (second edition). One thing that came out of our first research was librarians being nervous and concerned about copyright… We wanted to do more in this area… So we decided to do some work on phenomenography and Copyright as an experience, as a phenomenon, to enable us to understand appropriate educational interventions.

Chris: We categorised the experiences in various ways:

  • category 1: copyright is a problem
  • category 2: copyright is complicated and shifting
  • category 3: copyright is a known entitute requiring coherant messages
  • category 4: copyright is an opportunity for negotiation, collaboration and co-costructuion and understanding…

Jane: Copyright is a problem… The idea of copyright as an imposition… and not well aligned to goals of librarianship, of making material available to people…

In category 2 it’s about copyright as complicated, shifting, changing… “for non-copyright queries the answer is yes, or no, or a series of instructions but for copyright questions it’s maybe, or maybe, or maybe…”

Chris: In category 3 it’s about behaviour change, compliance, avoiding getting into trouble with publishers or the law.

The fourth category is about copyright as an opportunity… It can be about being assertive. When you look at what you share or publish… It can be easy to make sweeping assumptions… So you have to have conversations to reach a shared understanding of copyright… It’s best practice in the industry… And it’s important to also bring that to the profession…

And now that the one minute silence for London is observed… It’s Jane and Chris’ Don’t be Afraid Quiz Time… I won’t blog this as it is fast paced and there are prizes at stake! However… I have learned that HG Wells’ work only came out of copyright this year… 

Jane: So, what does this all mean?

Chris: What would the world be like without copyright literacy?

Jane: It would be a sad world… But why… Without copyright people don’t want to share things, people don’t know how to advise people… We can end up being risk averse – playing it safe and saying no… There are works in the public domain – if we don’t know what we can and can’t do, we see a reduction in what is available. And actually for libraries that would increase costs – rights holders will happily sell you licenses that you may not need – you may be able to use works under copyright exceptions…

Chris: So, we’ve been trying to find ways of bridging the gaps… It’s clearly a complex subject in a complex environment… We want to connect the practitioners to the activists. Some of us are really aware but there is  a gap, people working in the profession but not focused on copyright. There is also the concept of creators and consumers, and copyright enables that… But the realities of that distinction is unclear… Automatic copyright can be useful but also challenging.. And then we have rightsholders and libraries, and the need to work together to address barriers… There is also a thing about legal language, and the idea that copyright can only be explained in legal jargon, but there are ways to communicate it in a clearer way…

We have been doing work on the role of the copyright officer – and are analysing data from a survey on this…

Jane: To come back to copyright literacy, and critical copyright literacy… We have traditionally focused on training, and one day training events… I think we need to think differently. I spent some time with Prof. John Naughton in Cambridge.. He’d use the example of “think about your children at school and sex eductaion… Do they need education, or do they need training?!”.

There is balance between training and approach.. We want to develop people to think individually and find their own answers.. It’s about avoiding binary questions and become comfortable with uncertainty. There is no one way to Google, or one way to explore a catalogue, and there isn’t just one answer in copyright.

Chris: To put this into practice Jane and I have been setting up groups and get togethers in our local and London and South East f0r communities of practice around copyright.

Jane: And that’s also about rethinking copyright education for librarians… Bridging the gap between a one dat course and a PG Diploma in Copyright law, focusing on what librarians need to know about copyright, focusing on the copyright queries we work with. And we have to talk to library schools about the copyright education young professionals are getting during their qualification…

So, that leads us to the point I wanted to make: Copyright literacy is a journey not a destination (“Morrison and Secker (with apologies to Ralph Waldo Emerson)”). And you have to be comfortable with all that uncertainty.

So, some take aways…

Chris: Copyright is about knowledge, money and power. It is also about privelges, in all meanings of that word.

Jane: Copyright literacy means sharing and working as a community.

Chris: Librarians! Copyright belongs to you, own it! Indeed it belongs to everyone – not lawyers, but everyone.

Jane: Our next tour stop is Manchester! Join us! Now, we don’t expect you to love copyright. We want you to not be afraid, confused, baffled, but to see it as an exciting opportunity, and something that as a librarian you have some special priveleges…

Find out more at: https://copyrightliteracy.org or on Twitter: @UKCopyrightLit

Q&A

Q1: When I was a copyright librarian the question was “will I be sued”… ?

A1, Chris: It does come up when I speak to copyright officers. Copyright is civil not criminal law. Your organisation is often where responsibility lies. But rarely does anything go to court, usually it is demands for money, you pay it or deal with it in a process to make your case… That process is crucial as it makes it an efficient and helpful process.

A1, Jane: That does seem to be a major fear for people… Not many actual court cases though…

A1, Chris: There are very few.Though one in Australia on photocopying, few recently though… There’s not a lot of money in suing libraries… But there is a risk to be managed, and libraries need to show they are doing the right thing…

A fab opening session from Chris and Jane – not a surprise (the fun factor – always some copyright surprises and learning!) based on previous experience of their talks and workshops but delightful nonetheless… 

Parallel Session 1: Overcoming disability and barriers: Using assistive Technologies in libraries A joint presentation from

  • Craig Mill – CALL Scotland and Edinburgh Libraries award winning Visually Impaired People Project
  • Jim McKenzie – Lifelong Learning Library Development Leader – Disability Support,
  • Paul McCloskey – Lifelong Learning Strategic Development Officer (Libraries) and
  • Lindsay MacLeod – Project Volunteer

Craig Mill: I am from CALL Scotland one of the things we do is to provide an equipment pool for schools and children, so that they can be tried out. For instance we provide Augmentative and Alternative Communications devices and tools – traditionally these were hugely expensive but there are now inexpensive iPad apps that do much of this.

We also have learning resources, many of them supported by funding from NHS Scotland.

We also provide Books for All, which includes texts prepared to be accessible for those with additional support needs… Students can search for books, download them, and use them on their own devices. These are curriculum books, they are provided as PDF in a variety of formats, including large print for visually impaired students… You can magnify, adapt, and you can use preferences to alter document colours for high contrast, you can activate read out loud… You can customise to meet childrens needs. Lots of our Scottish Government funding goes towards the Books for All database.

We also have adapted digital assessments. When you have the SQA physical past paper, you can also now use this service to download and use digital past papers. Again these are a PDF type format with answer boxes. The pupil can go in, type in answers… And you have annotation tools… Including notes/sticky notes… These can be reduce costs by thousands for scribes… Can just have a student with a laptop and headphones now…

We also have Scottish voices… Traditionally they have been quite mechanical… We have a collection of Scottish synthetic voices: Heather; Stuart; Caitilin (gaelic). We have students using these in Scotland in schools, colleges, HE. And if you have a computer voice, you need something to read that…

We also have a tool called “WordTalk” that sits in Word. It just sits there and reads back to you as you type, it’s a free text-t0-speech plugin.

As well as that we have lots of information on assistive technologies. We are asked a lot about supporting pupils with dyslexia. So we now have quite a comprehensive resource on writing, reading, some case studies as well… e.g. Hamish uses OneNote, Notability, iPads… Some really useful stuff here.

And under our downloads section, if you are looking for resources, you’ll find the posters and leaflets – which we’ve become popular for. The most popular by far is our iPad Apps for Learners with Dyslexia resource.

Finally, my colleague Allan recently wrote a blog article on scanning pens and reading pens. These are now much much more accurate than they used to be. He wrote a comparison of the reading pens. In England there is an “exam pen” in exams… But it doesn’t have dictionaries etc. built in. Whereas the C-Pen reader has lots of features added in, including dictionaries… They are the market leaders. Allan compared these with apps that do similar things.

Paul, Jim and Lindsay

Paul: I’ll talk about how our work ties to local and national priorities. Then Jim will talk about the project, and Lindsay will give his experiences as a user.

Our message today is about helping visually impaired people to be empowered to be self-sufficient, with technology enabling access to information. Over 180k people in Scotland are effected by a significant level of sight loss. And the aging population and rise of diabetes mean that this is expected to double in Scotland in the next 10 years.

Blind and partially sighted people can feel isolated. In work on users needs, in their own words, they gave their priorities. VIP supports three of these:

  • That I can access information, making most of opportunity that technology can bring.
  • That I have someone to talk to.
  • That I have the support that I need.

And VIP helps support citizen engagement, community participation and participation in the library.

Jim: We can purchase equipment, but we also provide expertise and the time to get people set up. Four years ago Apple was leading the way with technologies… Setting it up wasn’t the easiest in the world. We had an existing resource centre that people used regularly. We had new users… We wanted to get new users engaged – posters in the library wouldn’t cut it. So we went out… To the RNIB Cafe, where we set up an audio book group, we talked to the eye hospital, we talked to guide dogs, we talked to the thriving macular degeneration group in Edinburgh. We concentrated on these groups and worked hard to develop those relationships.

We thought hard about location. We had 28 libraries, we set up in 10. We looked at safety in crossings and roads. We looked at the location of bus stops – we started a group in one location but no-one came as the bus was too far, crossings weren’t good. We also looked at facilities, and we looked at staffing. We gave some training in what we were offering. We got them to set up a patron, show them how to use wifi – if they could do that, it would be fine. Not all apps are accessible, but many are. There are podcasts. There is the RNIB Tech Talk podcast. Apple has Blind Vis, a group for those with visual impairment. There are apps for VO – Voice Over – to get you used to the interface.

Things we have to guard against included not spreading ourselves too thin – hence 10 not 28 libraries. We have used volunteers and champions. And we had to stay up to date, technology changes really really quickly. We get asked about books and newspapers. One group were asked what they really missed – one guy missed poker… Surprisingly hard to find an accessible app. We eventually found one – Theta Poker (where money is not involved) and I actually recommend it as an app designed for a visually impaired person.

It can be challenging to find and keep great volunteers, but when you find a great one it makes all the difference… On which note, over to Lindsey…

Lindsey: My personal involvement was back in 2014, through an introduction by the RNIB to Jim and what he was doing. I wanted to bring my experience in econtent into volunteering, and the Edinburgh Libraries were doing exactly the kind of things I wanted to do… When you are blind or visually impaired there are fewer choices but the Apple products are really great – not an advert, others are available!

I was really impressed by the groups I met… But the speed of progress is variable. The demographics of blind and partially sighted people tends towards older people and it takes longer to learn later in life, so we work with that. There were differences between blind and partially sighted people. The latter group can try to grasp onto what they are used to doing – and have to be convinced that with a blank screen they are still getting the functionality. That was a learning curve for me but I’ve had a great mentor. Abilities vary… And people’s familiarity with technology varies – the swiping idea can take many back to year zero though.

With these groups we do ask what they want from these devices. Some want to make a change. Some want just emails or audiobooks… But they learn there is virtually no limit to what they can do with an electronic device. The learning is not a linear classroom approach – given the mixture of abilities. So it’s more like a learning spiral, revisiting basic techniques, ensuring they understand what devices can do.

The local library environment is largely great. There is privacy. The staff are very welcoming. And ease of access is important – it’s daunting to navigate a new city without a guide. Libraries should be a universal space, and the things we learn require face to face interraction. Group feedback is essential, to tailor to needs, and to know when to revisit things and refresh them.

As a volunteer this has been a hugely rewarding experience, and I thank the libraries for that.

Paul: I hope Jim and Lindsey have given you an idea of the service. Right now we are looking at evaluating the programme, using RNIB and Online Today. We are also working with them to reach a wider group. We are seeing growth in volunteer, and we are seeing growth in capacity as important. Having a dialogue with our service users has been crucial, for instance deaf-blind families. The reinforcement and training have to continue, be refreshed, almost continually refresh the project, in order to reach a point of sustainability. It’s also brilliant that many who came to use for support are now leading the classes…

Traditionally people with visual impairment have been behind with technology, but with this project that is no longer the case. We’ll be running Six Steps courses over the next few months – see http://www.readingsight.org.uk/ I’m going to conclude with a video of Christine Morris – probably our best speaker of the bunch but sadly she couldn’t come along today!

Chris: I became partially sighted then blind and because of that didn’t do much and didn’t feel as able to leave the house… Then I got an iPhone… I went to the City Library and was shown by Jim how to use it… I then moved to using the Craigmillar library… At a certain point a number of us moved to iPads… It was a big jump but we all made steady progress… It was quite challenging as new people kept joining the group, but volunteers came in to help… Then I couldn’t make the same journey… I now go to the Stockbridge Library – much closer to home – and go regularly.

The technology has changed my life. I can now use email to stay in touch with friends across the world, I can listen to music, listen to the radio, I can download podcasts – The Archers, From Our Own Corespondant, and Inside Radio. And if you have a little sight you can use the camera, and the iPlayer – not useful for me… But I gather I can now record it with audio descriptions so I will try that!

Jim tried to make it that we didn’t just use the technology for practical things, but for fun things too… games and whatnot. I really like doing crosswords – I still do the Daily Telegraph crossword every day with my husband but I can’t do it on my own. But Jim showed me a crossword app I can use on the iPad on my own.

I think it’s so useful for people like me, who would otherwise be quite isolated. It has been a lifeline and I hope to go on and do much more with the technology!

Q&A

Comment: It’s great to hear first hand from a service user.

Paul: We presented to the COSLA judges a year ago. We had Chrissy and she was great – I’m sure that’s why we won! She highlighted things that seem small but can be a big challenge – like the crossword puzzle.

Chair: Some of you may be aware that a digital strategy piece of work has taken place, with a survey. One question on assistive technology only 11% of libraries claim to have assistive technology… But that may be about understanding definitions… So we will come back to that…

And now it’s networking lunch and exhibition time… 

Parallel Sessions 2: Spotlight on research – Papers on: Linked Data

Opening Scotland’s library content to the world (Dr. Diane Pennington, University of Strathclyde)

Thanks for coming to hear about linked data right after lunch! I will give an overview of Linked Data for those of you who may not be sure what it is…

So, a quick note on the evolution of the web (1989-now). We started with Web 1.0, hand-coded HTML pages, accessible and reliable, but not interactive; then web 2.0 with Facebook and Twittter, everyone can post, share and respond without extensive technical knowledge. Web 3.0 or the Semantic Web is about new ways to imagine and combine information on the web…

When Tim Berners Lee outlined the Semantic Web in terms of using URIs as names for things – so Strathclyde’s name on the semantic web is http://www.strath.ac.uk/ for instance.

When someone looks up a name, provide useful [RDF] information. Think grammatically here in terms of understanding relationships in a structured way. And we can include links to other URIs so that people can discover new things.

Anyone that uses Google is using Linked Data. When you see that panel – the Knowledge Graph – that is based on linked data from wikipedia, YouTube, etc.

So that’s the based of linked data, open data..

In 2015 the Scottish Government published an Open Data Strategy. They want any public service creating non-personal, non0commercially sensitive data to share it as linked data. ANd then the Scottish Government’s “Realising Scotland’s full potential in a digital world: A Digital Strategy for Scotland” (2017) this is further reinforced. And there is an official Scottish Government open linked data statistics page.

But this isn’t all where it should be… And what about libraries implementing linked data… Why should we do it? Well because peoplw can more easily find library resources on the web – through Google not (only) through our catalogue; more cerative applications based on library metadata; opportunities for cataloguing innovation and efficiency.

Back to Tim Berners Lee’s star rating of linked data… We are a long way from 5*s now.

So I have been doing a survey of Scotland’s Linked Open Data, with over 120 responses… A lot more people know what “linked data” means, rather than “semantic web” – a very related term. When I asked what it means, they knew it was about resource sharing, linking, availability and connectedness…  When it came to what “semantic web” means themes were around improved web searching, more structured online data for better organisation… But many of the definitions were not really correct…

When we asked if libraries had implemented, or were planning to implement any linked data… Not on the whole, which is unfortunate. Some concerns and limitations was about licensing constraints – permission needed from database providers to link. Teach practitioners what linked data can concretely achieve… Lack of knowledge – decisions made further up the chain? Potential loss of control of data. Concern that digitisation is linked to monetisation… And what to link to…

Despite that wider set of government strategy priorities, and NLS actions in this direction, there remain barriers to implementation… Lack of awareness, lack of time…

This is ongoing research, and I’ll be publishing the survey analysis at some point. I will be looking at Scottish library websites. I also want to do interviews around those plans/lack of plans… I also want to increase awareness among the ILS community around linked data and semantic web to potentially increase uptake..

Towards an information literacy strategy for Scotland (Dr. John Crawford)

Brief background here. I directed the Scottish Information Literacy Project (2004-2010). We built up a great network of contacts and collaborators. After I retired we shifted to the Right Information Community of Practice, founded in 2012. We communicate by blogging, email and twitter with meetings twice a year.

We bring together a diverse range of library sectors and representatives from education and skills bodies…

We have done various things… Including activism. In 2014 the Royal Society of Edinburgh report on Spreading the benefits of digital participation interim report came out… And we submitted a lengthly response which duly ended up in the final report. It outlined the role of libraries, and of information and digital skills… And the need for those skills to be embedded throughout the lifespan. These are all good, but hard to do.

We managed to meet with the minister in June 2015, we focused on democratic renewal for a better informed society. There was a further conference in 2016. We were able to improve links with other relevant bodies. The minister wanted a focus on “digital literacy” rather than “information literacy” which means she wouldn’t give us money…

But we live in a different world now. Many opportunities to vote and, in some cases in Scotland,  that included 16 and 17 year olds, bringing information literacy to a new group in a new way. After the referendum there was an increased interest from young people in politics and engaging in that type of debate.

Another area here is “health literacy”… This is tough information to get our heads round, and it matters greatly. 43% of English working-age adults will struggle to understand instructions to calculate a childhood paracetamol dose… That’s very basic and crucial literacy…

One of the things I tried to do when chairing the information literacy project was try to focus on particular innovation area – including Konstantina Martzoukou’s work with refugees that was presented this morning for instance. That was supported by an information literacy organisation… And connected information literacy to background policy documents…

Bill Johnston chairs the Older Person’s Alliance looking at older people and literacy around good health, pensions, recreation, etc. Lauren Smith is working on political engagement of young people, and the role of school librarians in political information literacy with young people. And we have making it easy – a health literacy policy for Scotland.

How do we evaluate services like this? And what kind of performance indicator can we use? It needs to be precise, and be a genuine indicator of success. I had a look at the literature… And it kept coming back to a special issue of Library Trends that I co-edited around 2011. Particularly work by Andrew Whitworth, which included “information literacy policy documents should be about information literacy and not something else” – sounds obvious but often they are actually about something else, e.g. IT skills. He also stated that such policy documents should have some sort of government support and relevance. They should be fully cross-sector. They should be informed and preferably led by the professional bodies of the countries concerned, and should be collaborative across organisation.

The other paper was by Woody, where he presented his “ten commandments” which included: patience and perseverance; find an in-house champion; link to the 21st century; resistance to change; don’t bite off more than you can choose, etc.

Whitworth’s criteria, particularly that one of information literacy being muddled with the digital agenda, have proved quite thorny. From Woody’s work the issue of champions has been partly addressed by attracting support from professional bodies, other professions and activities. Aiming for the top has been more problematic. Linking information literacy to specific long standing goals and reforms have been key to our activities. We’ve done our best to pilot test and experiment objectively deliberate on that.

If you want further reading I will recommend that 2011 issue of Library Trends, 60 (2). Strategic policy making issues in information literacy, in Library and information research, 40 (123), 2016 which includes articles by Lauren Smith and Bill Johnstone.

Q&A

Q1 – me) I was part of the RSE Inquiry Committee and we did have a lot of discussion about the relationship between digital literacy and information literacy – in a way it is all information literacy and we were aware of that, but also keen to focus on the specific challenges and issues around digital in that report. But I’d agree that information literacy is the fundamental set of skills.

A1 – John) It took so long for CIIPS to be interested in information literacy is the predominent skill set. IT skils and digital literacy skills, do naturally lead onto information literacy. I think we failed to make our case a number of years ago, and should have done.

Q2) Why wouldn’t the minister fund information literacy?

A2  John) If you speak to a government minister you have to look to those around and behind them… Civil servants do have an agenda of their own, and they do present that to the government ministers.. They have successfully presented the digital literacy agenda to ministers… Something that was encouraging was that the minister – Fiona Hyslop – did connect the idea of digital literacy to wider information literacy.

Q3) What is the kind of potential for linked data in libraries?

A3) Say all of our libraries in scotland shared catalogue records in linked open data, then it would also appear, not just videos and that type of content, when someone searches Google for e.g. “Loch Lomand”.

Comment 4) I work for the Scottish Government civil service. I would say it is a bit more positive now, with the digital strategy launched this year. It has taken us a while to make that link between information literacy and digital literacy. Slow progress but it is happening…

Q5) For small public libraries what is the first small step we should take?

A5) I would say what is the unique thing in your library, and focus on that, the quick wins… and make it available as linked open data.

Q6) How do we prioritise linked data over other issues when we are strapped for resources and have many priorities?

A6) Partly its about accountability, findability, transparancy to those that pay for our libraries through taxes, council tax, etc. A public accountability approach can be helpful.

Parallel Session 3: If I googled you – what would I find? Managing your digital footprint Nicola Osborne, Digital Education Manager, EDINA 3.15-3.35pm Refreshments and exhibition

Slides from my session will be available on my presentations and publications page shortly… 

Keynote 2 – Securing the future: where next for our community in 2018 and beyond? Nick Poole, Chief Executive, CILIP

This has been such a good event, it always has such a good buzz, and it is such a privilege to be part of. I’m talking about securing the future, but it’s not about us securing the future for ourselves, we’re securing the next generation’s right to learn, to be informed.

Two years ago there was a presentation here from IFLA about Sustainable Development Goals. These are th ebigger context for the work all of us are doing. Whatever the outcome of 8th June it will be a fresh start for your daily work, to make sure there is opportunity for these people.

We are living in a future that is transformative, and we are the people to make that happen, whether we realise it yet or not. We are a powerful community of information professionals. We are not just librarians, we are information managers, we are data professionals, we are knowledge managers. And it is so important that we are united in our values, and so excited about where we go next as a community.

CILIP members are embedded across the spectrum of public sector, private sector, third sector, all types of organisation. There are over 60,000 of us. And the CIBR estimates that 100,000 jobs for knowledge professionals in the coming years.

So you may have seen Securing the Future, our action plan 2016-2020. Our goal stated there is to “put library and information skills at the heart of a democratic, equal and prosperous society”. We want talented, creative library and information professionals everywhere. To should about what we do. We have three connected goals around being stronger and more inclusive as an organisation.

We have come a long way together as the four CILIP regions. A lot of what we speak about, our campaigns, are about delivering real, measurable change in the opportuniities for and status of librarians and information professionals.

I just wanted to pause to thank everyone for the fantastically effective #LibrariesMatter advocacy campaigns. When you win here, it benefits the wider community across the UK, it is media coverage and impact and meaningful stories of how we make a difference that I can take to government to explain what we do, that we can do these things too.

I really admire that in Scotland you have a little big of swagger and confidence about your libraries and where you are going, and we want to learn from it. And it makes a difference. In the local elections every single party made an above the line commitment to libraries.

And that has led into a national school library strategy for Scotland by the deputy First Minister for Scotland. We know that is words, but it can make a real impact, it is happening, it is hard to go back on. And I can take that back to UK government and make the case for England too .

As you may know we have been working with Chris Riddell (@chrisriddell50) to build our arguement about the huge importance of libraries and schools for literacy, for early years.

We have just launched, after announcement of the election, the #factsmatter campaign, calling on all parties to use evidence based campaigning. Most have signed up, though one – I won’t name them – said “that sounds like a trap!”

Facts DO matter. We shouldn’t tolerate fake facts, fake new, in our politics. Big Issue founder John Bird has advocated for us and continues to do that. We have celebrities and public figures backing this.

We have the “A Million Decisions” campaign demonstrating how librarians make a difference to healthcare, the lives and money saved because of knowledge and information. Coming to the NHS England commitment to libraries. We are absolutely delighted that there is a sister campaign – “A Right Decision” – in Scotland with NHS Scotland.

We are starting to look at how we develop a skilled workforce for the future. We do see retirements and redundancy, but we also see a huge influx of new entries to the profession. We have to develop skills, to ensure transferable information skills. I want young kids to say “I want to be a librarian” and for their parents to be proud of that!

So, we have to develop solutions and routes into the profession that opens us out…

Some announcements here. In our event in July in Manchester we will be launching a sector-wide Ethics Review. We will also launch a Public Library Skills Strategy for England, partnering with the Society of Chief Librarians. And that’s all about opening up the pathways.

Finally, how do we become a bigger, better, more inclusive professional association. Right now we represented about 15% of the sector. Other professional associations represent more like 23%. So to do that we need to make membership more accessible, more affordable, and make sure we champion equality, diversity, and truly represent the sector.

We will build our member networks, we will work on new standards, communities, and publications. And we will continue to build partnerships with organisations and companies that help us achieve our goals.

Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress, says “When librarians get together, something great happens”. We know that, we believe that.

And we aren’t securing the future for ourselves but for that new generation, for those that need us to be there.

Thank you to all at CILIPS, and here’s to CILIP and CILIPS working together to make the difference to 2018.

Q&A

Q1) You said information skills are at the heart of a democratic society… Isn’t it the case that CILIP has been a bit of a latecomer to information literacy. You and I were on the board in 2011 when we were asked to endorse the Alexandra Proclamation, which had been published 5 years previously… We are catching up but … We’ve had a Scottish and a Welsh Information Literacy project, when will there be a CILIP-led Information Literacy.

A1) Great question. We had three asks of political parties: to support public and school libraries; to acknowledge that the future is data driven; and that we need to have a workforce with information literacy skills to prepare them for the world. I think information literacy will have impact when there is an article in Tesco magazine. Facts Matter has been a really good opportunity to do that. And we need to build something after the election.

Comment) I think that whole campaign is spot on, and it’s great that that has tied into something so current and bigger than the sector, and created new opportunities.

A2) I’d like to say it was long plotted… Honestly I was on an ebay shop doing badges and decided it was the right slogan. Two organisations came to us on the back of the campaign, including the Royal Statistical Society, as they saw real opportunities to work together to build an information literate population.

President’s closing remarks – Liz McGettigan

I won’t go into huge detail but I have to thank Kathy and Sean for making such a brilliant seamless event. Thank you our sponsors, and Alex and our AV team who have been spot on. Most of all thank you to all our speakers, you have inspired us all. There have been fabulous presentations across such useful areas over the last two days. We have been impressed with projects on working with refugees, working with health information, such a range. When people say “libraries are just about books”, think back on all these amazing projects you are all delivering out there! I never cease to be amazed by what you are doing. I hope you go home inspired and galvanised. And it’s not about Sean, Kathy, Nick and I, it’s about all of you advocating for what you do, getting out and talking to media. So get out there!